Intranet (Individul Assigment) by Hassan Beik

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INDIVIDUL ASSIGMENT

NAME: Hassan Beik Mohamadzadeh
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Table of Contents
Table of Contents
INDIVIDUL ASSIGMENT1
Introduction:3
How TCP/IP Works:4
How Intranet Web Servers and Browsers Work:5
Overview of an Intranet Security System:6
Advantages of Intranets:7
Advantages & Disadvantages of Having Intranets8
REFRANCE:9

Introduction:

Intranet is a local or restricted communications network, esp. a private network created using World Wide Web software. An intranet is a private network that is contained within an enterprise. It may consist of many interlinked local area networks and also use leased lines in the wide area network. Typically, an intranet includes connections through one or more gateway computers to the outside Internet. The main purpose of an intranet is to share company information and computing resources among employees. An intranet can also be used to facilitate working in groups and for teleconferences. An intranet uses TCP/IP, HTTP, and other Internet protocols and in general looks like a private version of the Internet. With tunneling, companies can send private messages through the public network, using the public network with special encryption/decryption and other security safeguards to connect one part of their intranet to another. Typically, larger enterprises allow users within their intranet to access the public Internet through firewall servers that have the ability to screen messages in both directions so that company security is maintained. When part of an intranet is made accessible to customers, partners, suppliers, or others outside the company, that part becomes part of an extranet..

How TCP/IP Works:
An intranet is a private network built using the Internet's technology and communication protocols. At the heart of this technology-and what makes all intranet communications possible-are two protocols for exchanging information: The Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) and the Internet Protocol (IP). Together, these protocols are known as TCP/IP. They are separate protocols, not a single one, although they are tightly woven together to allow for the most efficient communications.

These two protocols perform their magic by doing something that seems deceptively simple. They break data into sections called packets, deliver those packets to the proper destinations on an intranet (or onto the Internet), and after they've been delivered, they reassemble the packets into their original form so that they can be viewed and used by the recipient. TCP performs the work of separating the data into packets and reassembling it, while IP is responsible for making sure that the packets are sent to the right destination.

How Intranet Web Servers and Browsers Work:
Without the World Wide Web, there would probably be very few intranets. There are many forces driving corporations to set up an intranet, but the main one is the dominating presence of the World Wide Web. The Web has made it possible for companies to better communicate vital information among employees, departments, and divisions; to better communicate with customers; and to make it easy for those within a company to get at the vast resources often locked up in corporate databases and information centers.

The Web makes it easy to publish information because each Web page allows people to incorporate text, graphics, sound, animation, and other multimedia elements. In essence, each page is an interactive multimedia publication. This means that a company can easily publish simple documents such as personnel handbooks or expense reports. They can also create sophisticated pages that let people do more than just read a corporate annual report, and also let them see videos of the company in action or listen to speeches by corporate officers. The page at the top (or entrance to a site) is called...
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