Intinsic Motivation for Knowledge Sharing

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Journal of Information Science
http://jis.sagepub.com/ Effects of extrinsic and intrinsic motivation on employee knowledge sharing intentions Hsiu-Fen Lin Journal of Information Science 2007 33: 135 originally published online 15 February 2007 DOI: 10.1177/0165551506068174 The online version of this article can be found at: http://jis.sagepub.com/content/33/2/135

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Effects of extrinsic and intrinsic motivation on employee knowledge sharing intentions

Hsiu-Fen Lin
Department of Shipping and Transportation Management, National Taiwan Ocean University, Taiwan, R.O.C.

Received 1 December 2005 Revised 30 March 2006 Abstract.
Numerous scholars and practitioners claim that motivational factors can facilitate successful knowledge sharing. However, little empirical research has been conducted examining the different kinds of motivation (extrinsic and intrinsic) used to explain employee knowledge sharing behaviors. By integrating a motivational perspective into the theory of reasoned action (TRA), this study examines the role of both extrinsic (expected organizational rewards and reciprocal benefits) and intrinsic (knowledge self-efficacy and enjoyment in helping others) motivators in explaining employee knowledge sharing intentions. Based on a survey of 172 employees from 50 large organizations in Taiwan, this study applies the structural equation modeling approach to investigate the research model. The results showed that motivational factors such as reciprocal benefits, knowledge self-efficacy, and enjoyment in helping others were significantly associated with employee knowledge sharing attitudes and intentions. However, expected organizational rewards did not significantly influence employee attitudes and behavior intentions regarding knowledge sharing. Implications for organizations are discussed.

Keywords: knowledge sharing; theory of reasoned action; extrinsic motivation; intrinsic motivation

1.

Introduction

Knowledge sharing can be considered an important process in organizations, because it is fundamental to generating new ideas and developing new business opportunities through socialization and the learning process of knowledge workers [1]. To increase the ability to manage knowledge sharing within and across the organization is thus one of the major challenges facing contemporary Correspondence to: Hsiu-Fen Lin, Department of Shipping and Transportation Management, National Taiwan Ocean University, No. 2, Beining Road, Keelung, Taiwan, R.O.C. E-mail: hflin@mail.ntou.edu.tw Journal of Information Science, 33 (2) 2007, pp. 135–149 © CILIP, DOI: 10.1177/0165551506068174 Downloaded from jis.sagepub.com at MULTIMEDIA UNIV PERPUSTAKAAN on April 2, 2013

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organizations [2, 3]. Dyer and Nobeoka [4] indicated that knowledge sharing could be defined as the activities of how to help communities of people work together, facilitating the exchange of their knowledge, enhancing organizational learning capacity, and increasing their ability to achieve individual and organizational goals. Moreover, numerous researchers have indicated that the organizational value of employee knowledge increases when it is shared [5–8]. Only when employees are willing to share knowledge with colleagues can organizations begin to manage knowledge...
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