International Management and Globalization of Csr

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International Management (IM)
& ‘Glocalization’ of
Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR)

Table of Contents

|1 Abstract ……………………………………………………….………………………….. |3 | |2 Introduction ……………………………………………………………………....………. |3 | |3 Overview ……………………….………………………………………………………… |5 | |4 Problems & Methods ……………………………………………………………………... |7 | |5 A Critique of Glocal …………………………………………..………………………….. |8 | |6 Conclusion…………………………………………………………….……………..….… |11 | |7 Reference ………………………………………………...………..……………………… |12 | |8 Appendix …………………………………………………………….………………..….. |13 |

Abstract

In an attempt to bridge the global vs. local debate that rages across many disciplines, some academics and practitioners have been promoting an integrated internationalization strategy. Promoted as the ideal, an integration strategy helps both generate efficiencies through product and process innovations and respond to particular markets, this integration of global consistency and local flexibility can be captured in the concept of ‘glocal’, and is utilized at multiple levels such as within networks, companies, and individual managers. While many companies have been employing the ‘glocal’ or ‘local worldwide’ strategy for the past few decades with varying success, there is little evidence to suggest whether this ideal strategy is also used for CSR and whether it is in fact ideal. In Mr. Bondy’s paper, he investigates the level of CSR ‘glocalization’ within 37 MNCs in two ways: first, by identifying the level of integration of other cultures in the development of their CSR strategies; and second, by analyzing the process by which global and local issues are identified and incorporated into CSR strategy and the implications this has for CSR activities within MNCs. It then questions the implications of ‘glocalization’ within CSR and connects to the global vs. local debate in both the CSR and international management (IM) literature.

Introduction
Nowadays, concerns that MNCs might be pursuing profit at the expense of vulnerable workforces, the environment and so on have been raised by the controversies surrounding the process of globalization. And MNCs have increasingly taken steps aimed at demonstrating their social responsibility as business organizations in response to such concerns. MNCs are distinct forms of business because they operate across national borders and are thus embedded in different contexts with different structures and relational networks. This creates novel business opportunities and challenges such as access to cheap labor and natural resources, working with foreign governments and in foreign cultures, tacit knowledge of new groups of people for use in innovative new offerings and co-creation of products etc. MNCs therefore have many unique challenges working to govern their practices in such large and widespread operations. These seemingly paradoxical conditions within MNCs have been much debated within international management (IM) literature, where many contributions discuss the tensions. The literature on integration or ‘glocal’ internationalization strategies (Robertson, 1995) focuses on balancing global and local concerns in two ways: the first group argues that companies can generate efficiencies and opportunities by exploiting gains from standardization, while at the same time respond to and expand in local and particular markets by...
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