International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management Emerald Article: International Logistics and One-Stop Shopping

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Logistics, Mode of transport, Third-party logistics
  • Pages : 25 (6582 words )
  • Download(s) : 145
  • Published : May 10, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management Emerald Article: International logistics and one-stop shopping Janjaap Semeijn, David B. Vellenga

Article information:
To cite this document: Janjaap Semeijn, David B. Vellenga, (1995),"International logistics and one-stop shopping", International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, Vol. 25 Iss: 10 pp. 26 - 44 Permanent link to this document: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/09600039510101780 Downloaded on: 01-04-2012 References: This document contains references to 27 other documents Citations: This document has been cited by 2 other documents To copy this document: permissions@emeraldinsight.com This document has been downloaded 2086 times.

Access to this document was granted through an Emerald subscription provided by UNIVERSITY OF SYDNEY For Authors: If you would like to write for this, or any other Emerald publication, then please use our Emerald for Authors service. Information about how to choose which publication to write for and submission guidelines are available for all. Additional help for authors is available for Emerald subscribers. Please visit www.emeraldinsight.com/authors for more information. About Emerald www.emeraldinsight.com With over forty years' experience, Emerald Group Publishing is a leading independent publisher of global research with impact in business, society, public policy and education. In total, Emerald publishes over 275 journals and more than 130 book series, as well as an extensive range of online products and services. Emerald is both COUNTER 3 and TRANSFER compliant. The organization is a partner of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) and also works with Portico and the LOCKSS initiative for digital archive preservation. *Related content and download information correct at time of download.

IJPDLM 25,10

International logistics and one-stop shopping
Janjaap Semeijn
Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, University of Limburg, Maastricht, The Netherlands, and

26
Received February 1995 Revised May 1995

David B. Vellenga
Haworth College of Business, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA Introduction During the last ten years several large carriers have made substantial investments to acquire the in-house capability to provide global transportation and logistics services to international shippers. The term “mega carrier” has been used to denote this new breed of global transportation company. The term “one-stop shopping” is frequently used to describe their total service capability[1]. One-stop shopping presents a significant development which follows directly the arguments made in the common ownership literature[2-5]. One-stop shopping could change the nature of international shipping. It could surpass the traditional way of contracting separately for multiple transport modes and services, with or without the assistance of shipping intermediaries[6]. Under the one-stop shopping concept shippers delegate this responsibility to a single carrier. The one-stop shopping concept thus far has met with mixed reactions from international shippers, and has produced mixed results for the companies offering such services[7,8]. The literature addressing experiences with one-stop shopping has speculated on the causes of the implementation difficulties experienced by global carriers and the concept’s lack of market acceptance[1,9]. It is theorized that the one-stop shopping concept cannot be a success unless the service providers are meeting the expectations of their customers. A condition for meeting customer expectations is understanding these expectations. This article reports on a shipper-carrier comparison study designed to learn about international shipper expectations of one-stop shopping and global carrier understanding of these expectations. The perceptions of a large sample of US importers and exporters are compared with the perceptions of managers at...
tracking img