Internalization of Values Socialization of the Baraka and Keiski

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Internalization of Values
Socialization of the Baraka and Keiski

Aubrey Love
English Comp 3
Dr. Popham
3/21/2012

The people who inhabit a community and their interactions with one another comprise a society. These repeated interactions allow people to internalize or, hold true, what society portrays as everyday norms and values. These norms and values are instilled during childhood through the time he or she becomes an adult. Amiri Baraka’s autobiography “School” and Lisa Keiski’s essay “Suicide’s Forgotten Victims,” makes this evident. In both “School” and “Suicide’s Forgotten Victims,” Baraka’s and Keiski’s daily interactions with their peers, authority figures, and society contribute to the formulation of important life lessons. Through the daily interactions with his peers in his educational setting, Baraka internalizes concepts pivotal to real world situations. School provided Baraka with an environment to social with students that have common interests and goals: “The games and sports of the playground and streets was one registration carried with us as long as we live” (260). Friends compose the next primary socializing agent outside the family. It allows Baraka to see beyond his small world at home and introduces him to new experiences. Physical and recreational activities are important components in childhood development. Interactions with his peers provided Baraka with his first experience of equal status relationships. When Baraka played around with his friends, he made a distinction between himself and the others around him. The games shared between his friends shows that Baraka began learning to understand the idea of multiple roles; the duties and behaviors expected of someone who holds a particular status. Baraka took the values he learned from playing with his friends and certified them, implementing them in his everyday actions for the rest of his life. Baraka’s peers allowed him to internalize a vital life lesson necessary...
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