Internal Control at Ljb Company

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
1.0 INTRODUCTION2
2.0 Role of internal control2
2.1 Management:2
2.2 Board of Directors:3
2.3 Auditors:3
2.4 Staff and junior managers4
3.0 NEW RULES OF INTERNAL CONTROL4
4.0 THE GOOD AND THE BAD10
5.0 RECOMMENDATIONS12
6.0 REFERENCES14

1.0 INTRODUCTION
Internal control is defined as a process affected by an organization's structure, work and authority flows, people and management information systems, designed to help the organization accomplish specific goals or objectives. It is a means by which an organization's resources are directed, monitored, and measured. It plays an important role in preventing and detecting fraud and protecting the organization's resources, both physical (e.g., machinery and property) and intangible (e.g., reputation or intellectual property such as trademarks) Under SOX, all public traded U.S. corporations are required to maintain an adequate system of internal controls. Corporate executives and boards of directors must ensure that these controls are reliable and effective. As with any business, the transformation of going from a private to public requires some extensive planning and preparation. It is recommended that LJB being a relatively small sized company in terms of its employees should reevaluate the costs versus the benefits of being a public traded company. If LJB decides to issue stock it would be wise to answer the following questions How many shares should be authorized for sale?

How to issue the stock?
What value should be assigned to the stock?

2.0 Role of internal control
According to the COSO Framework, everyone in an organization has responsibility for internal control to some extent. Virtually all employees produce information used in the internal control system or take other actions needed to affect control. Also, all personnel should be responsible for communicating upward problems in operations, noncompliance with the code of conduct, or other policy violations or illegal actions. Each major entity in corporate governance has a particular role to play:

2.1 Management:
The Chief Executive Officer (the top manager) of the organization has overall responsibility for designing and implementing effective internal control. More than any other individual, the chief executive sets the "tone at the top" that affects integrity and ethics and other factors of a positive control environment. In a large company, the chief executive fulfills this duty by providing leadership and direction to senior managers and reviewing the way they're controlling the business. Senior managers, in turn, assign responsibility for establishment of more specific internal control policies and procedures to personnel responsible for the unit's functions. In a smaller entity, the influence of the chief executive, often an owner-manager, is usually more direct. In any event, in a cascading responsibility, a manager is effectively a chief executive of his or her sphere of responsibility. Of particular significance are financial officers and their staffs, whose control activities cut across, as well as up and down, the operating and other units of an enterprise.

2.2 Board of Directors:
Management is accountable to the board of directors, which provides governance, guidance and oversight. Effective board members are objective, capable and inquisitive. They also have knowledge of the entity's activities and environment, and commit the time necessary to fulfill their board responsibilities. Management may be in a position to override controls and ignore or stifle communications from subordinates, enabling a dishonest management which intentionally misrepresents results to cover its tracks. A strong, active board, particularly when coupled with effective upward communications channels and capable financial, legal and internal audit functions, is often best able to identify and correct such a...
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