Intercultural Business Communication Assignment

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 183
  • Published : February 7, 2011
Open Document
Text Preview
article ‘Hofstede’s model of national cultural differences and their consequences: A triumph of faith – a failure of analysis’: In particular, McSweeney questions the plausibility of national cultures being systematically causal, i.e. that the identification of the differences causes or leads directly to the behaviour of the nation or people from that nation. McSweeney is also concerned that Hofstede's work has led others to believe that influential national cultures exist and that this work is based on evidence of a poor quality. McSweeney contends, therefore, that Hofstede's project is 'a misguided attempt to measure the unmeasurable.' The complaint is that, as Albert Einstein once observed: 'Not everything that counts can be counted, and not everything that can be counted counts.' In essence, McSweeney is challenging 'the plausibility of a determinate relationship' between national culture and uniform national actions and/or institutions. Do nations have cultures?

Critique point: Hofstede should have broadened his research and thereby not only using the IBM subsidiaries but also other large corporations, in order to gather more precise information.

Keywords: “mental programming”, “software of the mind”, a “common component” of a wider culture which contains both global and sub-national constituents. A small number of respondents. Narrowness of the population surveyed. National uniformity

Yugoslavia example
High vs low context countries
In my opinion, you can’t base culture and behavioral attributes on findings from just one company, over 100,000 people and forty different countries compared to the billions of people in the world. The fact that one person acts a certain way under certain circumstances does not mean that others from the same country act the same way. I agree with Brendan McSweeney.

Although Geert Hofstede’s model of Cultural Dimension can be of great use when it comes to general analyzing of a country’s culture, there are a few things one has to keep in mind. First would be that the average of a country does not relate to...

Do nations have cultures?
Power distance communication In a high power distance cultures the following may be observed: . Those in authority openly demonstrate their rank.

. Subordinates are not given important work and expect clear guidance from above. . Subordinates are expected to take the blame for things going wrong. . The relationship between boss and subordinate is rarely close/personal. . Politics is prone to totalitarianism.

. Class divisions within society are accepted.
In a low power distance culture:
. Superiors treat subordinates with respect and do not pull rank. . Subordinates are entrusted with important assignments.
. Blame is either shared or very often accepted by the superior due to it being their responsibility to manage. . Managers may often socialise with subordinates.
. Liberal democracies are the norm.
. Societies lean more towards egalitarianism.
If you are working with or going to a country with a higher PDI than yours then: - give clear and explicit directions to those working with you. Deadlines should be highlighted and stressed. - do not expect subordinates to take initiative.

- be more authoritarian in your management style. Relationships with staff may be more distant than you are used to. - show respect and deference to those higher up the ladder. This is usually reflected through language, behaviour and protocol. - expect to encounter more bureaucracy in organizations and government agencies. If you are working with or going to a country with a lower PDI than yours then: - don't expect to be treated with the usual respect or deference you may be used to. - people will want to get to know you in an informal manner with little protocol or etiquette. - be more inclusive in your management or leadership style as being directive...
tracking img