Integrated Programming Model

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(Read materials about IPM. Give a summary of IPM in one page. Narrate what would be the challenges in implementing IPM in World Vision Bangladesh in terms of program, partnerships and staffing and how do we address them? In your opinion, what are the opportunities that IPM may bring to World Vision Bangladesh? What are your specific recommendations to your Regional Associate Director on IPM implementation (in terms of programs, partnerships and staffing) in your region)

Submitted To:
HR & OD Department
LEAD Program
World Vision Bangladesh
Banani, Dhaka-1213

Name of Coach:
Ryan Belasoo
National Office, World Vision Bangladesh.

Submission Date:
Date:

Prepared & Submitted by:
Assutush Rema
Sector Coordinator (Livelihood Security Project)
Fulbaria ADP, World Vision Bangladesh.

Introduction: The integrated programming model (IPM) has been developed through a process of co-creation involving staff across World Vision, with special emphasis on local-level staff. The integrated programming model equips World Vision local-level staff to work effectively with partners toward the sustained well-being of children within families and communities especially the most vulnerable. Most vulnerable means people who are most scorned, left out, viewed as less than human, viewed as less valuable, marginalized. For World Vision, integration in programming means bringing together key elements of our ministry and resources in ways that are context appropriate, while building on local assets and efforts already underway. Integration is not an end in itself. World Vision works towards greater integration in order to contribute more effectively toward the goal defined in the WV ministry framework: sustained well-being of children within families and communities, especially the most vulnerable. The model has four main aspects: 1. Equipping local level staff that includes role of WV local level staff, key competency and management support 2. Working with partners that include understanding of partnering, types of partners and the critical path 3. Contributing towards child well being that includes child well being outcomes, child participation project model and measurement and 4. Basic program parameters that includes geographical size (less than 2 hrs) target population less than 50000) life span and cycle Resourcing, Governance sponsorship programming integrated more.

Partnering is central to the integrated programming model, and helps to achieve wider, more sustained household and community resilience and capacity to care and provide for children. Partnership means more than simply networking, one-off activities, or meeting an agreed upon contract to deliver certain services. Partnerships for sustained child well-being are designed to develop a strategic collaboration between different parties – sometimes but not always from different sectors of society – where each: • Contributes resources and competencies

• Shares risks as well as benefits
• Works towards a common goal.
Stage 1
Preparing
Engaging and Visioning
Planning for partnership
Managing and Transitioning
Stage 2
Stage 3
Stage 4
Step 1
Step 2
Step 3
Step 4
Step 5
Step 7
Step 6
Step 8
The Critical Path is a process for putting World Vision’s integrated programming into action by working with partners and communities toward the sustained well-being of children, especially the most vulnerable. It is a suggested step-by-step approach composed of simple guiding questions that WV program staff can answer together with partners and communities. The Critical Path is divided into four stages:

In stage 1: includes both the assessment phase and the first step of the Critical Path ‘Who are we?’ and state 2 development Facilitators engage the community to find out who they are and what is currently being done to improve child well being, and to develop a community vision for child well-being. They explore the meaning of child...
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