Inherit the Wind

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  • Topic: Evolution, Inherit the Wind, Scopes Trial
  • Pages : 2 (675 words )
  • Download(s) : 157
  • Published : February 7, 2012
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The Scope’s Trial – or Monkey Trial, was an infamous event that shed light on a very dark area in one of the world’s most controversial issues. In the play, Inherit the Wind by Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee, the authors attempt to fictionalize the court case to provide a very interesting view of the controversial event to their audience. Using certain rhetorical strategies such as appealing to their audience emotionally, along with many literary devices like diction, syntax, allusions, and subjectivity in the controversy, help to convey a variety of important messages to audiences around the globe.

The controversy of Darwin versus The Holy Father is perhaps the greatest argument of all time. In the novel, these two concepts are approached and defended by two men, who with the playwright’s use of syntax in their dialogues; embody the feelings and image of the side that they’re defending. When the authors wrote of Brady’s inquisition to the young schoolboy Howard, Brady said “…In all this talk of bugs and ‘evil-ution’, did Mr. Cates ever make a reference to God or the Miracle He achieved in seven days as described in the beautiful book of Genesis?”(Lawrence, Lee 69). This question causes the audience to be swayed against Bertram Cates because of certain diction that the authors use, such as “beautiful” and “evil”. With the use of these powerful words, the author’s tone of the story is in favor of Colonel Brady, and with the authors new subjectivity towards the case, so it the readers.

Diction is again another key aspect used in creating a personal connection between this case and our lives today. Even simple things like the language of the courtroom make it easier for audiences to relate to the novel. Judges still asked for “order” and courtroom procedures were still the same. Lawyers still “approached the bench”, called “objection” and cried for their side’s argument. These terms give readers a sense of familiarity, while also giving the authors a...
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