Informal Logic

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Week 5 Final Paper: “Should homosexuals be able to marry?” PHI 103: Informal Logic
Instructor:
January, 28, 2013

“Should homosexuals be able to marry?”
In the United States marriage laws are not supposed to discriminate, yet many people believe that marriages are clear religious and official vows, between a man and woman, which include the ultimate expression of love. The traditional belief does not claim a specific sexual orientation for homosexuals in this country who are Americans, and have the right to marry. This essay identifies specifically to the question; “Should homosexuals be able to marry.” Some people say “yes” and some say “no. Therefore, an evaluation of the marriage laws for the United State that allows homosexuals marriages, and the fact that the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and Constitution claim that homosexuals are equal, and have the same rights and limits as heterosexuals. This argument considers the rights of every person regardless of his or her sexual preference. Shell, (2004), writes “the issue of gay marriage can be reduced to the question of whether the desired union between homosexuals is more like a marriage between heterosexuals” (p. 1). Homosexual’s marriages seek the essence of marriage, in general as described above in a basic sense. A beginning step to define an approach to marriage is to discover methods that help individuals understand marriage. The similarity would be a human situation that simultaneously has a reasonable impartiality concerning respect to present-day conflicts such as homosexual’s marriages. Many people respect the concept of marriage, and acknowledge secure relationships; whether a man and a woman or same sex partners. The pros and cons are unbiased views that demonstrate the laws and civil rights for everyone. For example, disallowing marriage for gay couples or rejecting marriages for gay couples are mostly a religious belief. An example, homosexuality is an offense to GOD. United States, (2003), “The First Amendment bluntly states that a person's religious belief or lack thereof has to be look after” (p. 1). Marriage by the state is an action, and the government cannot create laws for reasons that conflict with religious beliefs. Religions consider homosexuality a sin; the belief is that it would deteriorate the meaning and value relating to the foundation of marriage; it would deteriorate the conventional family significance vital to the social order. For example, a slant in the legitimacy of marriage could create situations, such as marrying several wives or marrying an animal. This practice would confuse children in areas of gender roles and beliefs in society. For example, the belief may be, “only man and woman may pro-create,” therefore, the belief is that a homosexual lifestyle is something “not” supported. A counter-thesis for example, “homosexual should not be able to marry, and the counter-argument offers strong objections, which includes discrimination laws, and equal rights for homosexual people. Responses to rebut the counter-argument is based on evidence drawn upon, and shows that it would not be “just” to deprive homosexuals’ of their civil rights, Article One, Six of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The Universal Declaration of Human Summary adopted by the United Nations on December 10th, 1048 “consist of 30 articles setting forth the civil and political and economic, social and cultural rights to which all persons are entitled, with discrimination. Article 1, all human beings are born free and equal; article 6, everyone has the right to be recognized everywhere as a person before the law” (p. 1). The states that recognize and allow same-sex-marriages are Connecticut, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Vermont, Washington, and the District of Columbia. Same-sex marriage in Washington will go into affect...
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