Infection Control

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Nursing Procedures Followed to Control and Prevent Nosocomial / Hospital Acquired Infection’s (HCAI’S)

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Table of Contents………………………………………………………………………Page 1 Essay……………………………………………………………………….……………Page 2 – 7 Reference List………………………………………………………………….……….Page 8
The Nursing Procedures Followed to Control and Prevent Nosocomial / Hospital Acquired Infection’s (HCAI’S)

This essay will explore the subject Infection Control and how Healthcare Professionals control and prevent nosocomial or hospital acquired infections (HCAI’s), defined as an “infection whose development is favoured by a hospital environment, such as one acquired by a patient during a hospital visit or one developing among hospital staff” Oxford Dictionary (2008). Common nosocomial infections include; urinary tract infections (UTI), surgical wound infections, as well as causative agents which are coagulase-negative meticillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Escherichia Coli (E-Coli), Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamases (ESBL’s), Diarrhoea and vomiting (D&V) and Clostridium Difficile (C.Diff) to mention a few. I plan to explore this subject matter to inquire into and evaluate the evidence proposed by published research articles and published literature, alongside that of Government guidelines for the effectiveness and practicability in reducing the frequency of nosocomial infections and nosocomial colonisation and infection within a hospital setting. By evaluating the nursing procedures followed to control and prevent nosocomial infections, I believe that after cautious examination of research can offer Healthcare Professionals, a better understanding of how an action, such as that of the best course of treatment or drug affects and targets a nosocomial infection. By reading and researching my chosen subject I hope to increase and improve my learning, which will allow me to practice and contribute to evidence based-practice as suggested by….

My data will be sampled on adult Service User’s only, as this will allow me to reflect on my own experience through my current nursing placement.

For all Healthcare Professionals to understand how to prevent and control nosocomial infections, they must understand that they all have an individual responsibility to follow their own local Trust’s infection and control guidelines of which they work for, as well as that set by the local Department of Health Authorities, as this will reduce and theoretically minimise the risks towards Service Users, themselves and others alike. Current legislation which are in place and that are related to the prevention and control of infections are; The Health and Social Care Act (2008), Getting Ahead of the Curve (2008), Winning Ways (2003) and Essential Steps to Safe Clean Care: reducing health care associated infection (2006), however these are just a selected few. All of these mentioned provide significant information on exactly how to move in the direction of compliance with policies and evidence based -practice.

Despite the fact that hospitals use recommended sterilisation techniques as well as disposable materials, nosocomial infections still remain a constant problem, specifically to those service users that are weaker, and in addition to the chain of transmission within the hospital setting itself. Hand hygiene should be one of the first priorities of minimising infection control and is considered the most effective and cost-effective means of prevention as suggested by Gould et al (2006), as hands are one of the most common ways of which micro-organisms predominantly that of bacteria, of which many are becoming increasingly resistant to antibiotics that are commonly used to treat such nosocomial infections. For instance, the bacterial strain of MRSA which was first identified in the 1880s as the most common cause of infected surgical wounds and could cause serious or occasionally fatal disease. With the introduction of penicillin in the 1940s, it...
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