Inequality and Poverty

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Imagine that you and your next door neighbor were going to run a foot race. Then, your neighbor's friend holds you stationery until your neighbor has completed a great portion of the race. Finally, your neighbor's friend releases you so that you may complete in the race. Sprinting vigorously and freely, it would be nearly impossible to win. Could you win or at minimum, could you be any type of competition? This analogy is equivalent to the governmental position taken in the 1960's particularly 1968—the year that the Civil Right's Act was enacted. But, why mention the Civil Right's Act, everyone is equal now right? Wrong! The act was a success on paper, but failed to do the most important thing, and that is to give people in poverty opportunities in order to survive in the United States but instead, they failed to provide a substantial financial system, particularly for the minority. Without finances--hopes and dreams are just hopes and dreams that are never to materialize. As whites in America lost their ‘supreme' status due to the abolishment of discrimination based on race, those that could move out of the city in order to segregate themselves from minorities, and into newly established suburbs did so. This exodus stripped many urban areas of the needed resources and funding needed for repairs and replenishment of governmental property in the areas that were fled, further exacerbating the equality issue. The topic of inequality and poverty is very delicate, but with careful observation, one would conclude that the U.S. has not paid enough dues to repair a history of atrocities. As the U.S. operates under partial capacity, inequality and its direct relationship with poverty in America is the result of citizen refusal to right governmental wrongs that have relinquished minorities of hopes, dreams, ambition, and dignity.

Throughout the history of the United States, there has been a constant battle with the inconsistency of poverty against wealth. The United States being one of the wealthiest nations in the world, with all its resources-still has many people struggling economically. As a society, we are to blame for the inequalities that arise through unequal education, job opportunities, and racism. We are simply a society that glorifies the rich, and forgets the poor. Although race is far from being the only type of inequality that Americans face, it is the most evident. In addition, age is also another factor that should not be excluded as a mode of unfair treatment since the elderly are just as susceptible to being exposed to oppression. In a nation of fast-paced technological advances, the seniors of today are considered broken goods. Without a consistent, sustaining wage, this nation is throwing away everyone and everything that is unable to feed the economic machine. The elderly are expected to wither away and die, when they were once sitting in our positions at some place of employment or fine educational institution. As the saying goes, "Once a man, twice a child", the elderly and our youth are social targets left to have someone else help supply their needs. Seeing that both groups are being neglected, the wisdom that we receive from the elderly, and in contrast, the vitality of our youth- is at risk. Regrettably, as our children today grow into adulthood, they are confronted with the harsh reality that with the way the government is operating and slowly neglecting its citizens, and without a strong political voice, they are contorted into a position of disadvantage. Be it so, if they are the product of uneducated parents then the future of the children is utterly bleak. And while the President and his ‘elite' company enjoy dinner parties, the nation's children and elderly alike suffer through the night's hunger just as my husband did while subdued in poverty. As people in society age, we must come to grips with a dismal future as social misfits. In astonishment, most of the American...
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