Industrial Robot

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  • Topic: Robotics, Industrial robot, Robot
  • Pages : 5 (1669 words )
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  • Published : December 26, 2012
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An industrial robot is defined by ISO[1] as an automatically controlled, reprogrammable, multipurpose manipulator programmable in three or more axes.

Typical applications of robots include welding, painting, assembly, pick and place (such as packaging, palletizing andSMT), product inspection, and testing; all accomplished with high endurance, speed, and precision. -------------------------------------------------

Robot types, features
The most commonly used robot configurations are articulated robots, SCARA robots, Delta robots and Cartesian coordinate robots, (aka gantry robots or x-y-z robots). In the context of general robotics, most types of robots would fall into the category of robotic arms (inherent in the use of the word manipulator in the above-mentioned ISO standard). Robots exhibit varying degrees of autonomy:

Some robots are programmed to faithfully carry out specific actions over and over again (repetitive actions) without variation and with a high degree of accuracy. These actions are determined by programmed routines that specify the direction, acceleration, velocity, deceleration, and distance of a series of coordinated motions. Other robots are much more flexible as to the orientation of the object on which they are operating or even the task that has to be performed on the object itself, which the robot may even need to identify. For example, for more precise guidance, robots often contain machine vision sub-systems acting as their "eyes", linked to powerful computers or controllers. Artificial intelligence, or what passes for it, is becoming an increasingly important factor in the modern industrial robot. George Devol applied for the first robotics patents in 1954 (granted in 1961). The first company to produce a robot was Unimation, founded by Devol and Joseph F. Engelberger in 1956, and was based on Devol's original patents. Unimation robots were also calledprogrammable transfer machines since their main use at first was to transfer objects from one point to another, less than a dozen feet or so apart.

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Technical description
[edit]Defining parameters
* Number of axes – two axes are required to reach any point in a plane; three axes are required to reach any point in space. To fully control the orientation of the end of the arm (i.e. the wrist) three more axes (yaw, pitch, and roll) are required. Some designs (e.g. the SCARA robot) trade limitations in Degrees of freedom which is usually the same as the number of axes. * motion possibilities for cost, speed, and accuracy.

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* Kinematics – the actual arrangement of rigid members and joints in the robot, which determines the robot's possible motions. Classes of robot kinematics include articulated, cartesian, parallel and SCARA. * Carrying capacity or payload – how much weight a robot can lift. * Speed – how fast the robot can position the end of its arm. This may be defined in terms of the angular or linear speed of each axis or as a compound speed i.e. the speed of the end of the arm when all axes are moving. * Acceleration - how quickly an axis can accelerate. Since this is a limiting factor a robot may not be able to reach its specified maximum speed for movements over a short distance or a complex path requiring frequent changes of direction. * Accuracy – how closely a robot can reach a commanded position. When the absolute position of the robot is measured and compared to the commanded position the error is a measure of accuracy. Accuracy can be improved with external sensing for example a vision system or Infra-Red. See robot calibration. Accuracy can vary with speed and position within the working envelope and with payload (see compliance). * Repeatability - how well the robot will return to a programmed position. This is not the same as accuracy. It may be that when told to go to a certain X-Y-Z position that it gets only to within 1 mm of that position....
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