Induction and Orientation Program

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Induction

Induction is the process for introducing a new employee to their work environment. It extends from the moment the prospective employee reads the advertisement for the position and fuses with their training and development as a part of the organisation.

Why do we need an induction procedure?

A proper induction will give both the employees and the organisation the following benefits:

(1) It improves the motivation of new employees by helping them (2) quickly assimilate the workplace culture, as well as (3) their knowledge of the products/services provided by the organisation and the systems in place. This in turn (4) boosts confidence and improves (5) work quality and productivity, as well as helping to (6) reduce incidences of early leaving, which can be extremely costly to the organisation. (7) As induction involves other staff other than the inductee, the process can also be useful in developing the skills of existing staff.

As well as these benefits induction can ensure that (8) health and safety rules are properly disseminated to all staff and a good induction will help with an (9) Investment in People application.

How do we put together an Induction procedure?

A successful induction process has three Goals -

1. Helps new employees settle in;
2. Helps new employees understand their responsibilities and what is expected of them; 3. Ensures the employer receives the benefit of the new employee as quickly as possible.

Who should attend an induction process?

An induction process is not simply for new employees. The same benefits can be received by staff who have been promoted or transferred or those who have returned from a long period of absence. Furthermore you should be careful to include against long term temporary staff, who are entitled to the same training and development as permanent staff members. To not do so could harm your organisation and may be considered discriminatory.

What should we put in an Induction process?

An induction process should have three themes running through it. It should be;

1. Flexible and interesting;
2. Employee centred;
3. Meets equal opportunities requirements.

Objectives of induction

Despite its particular term, induction is simply another part of the training process that organisations invest in their staff. Like any form of training it should have the objective of developing the relevant skills, knowledge and behaviour of employees that their posts require. Such training should be SMART (Specific, Measurable, Action orientated, Relevant, Time bound)

Roles of other people in induction

It is not sufficient to simply present a new staff member with a file of information and told to get on with it. An induction process should involve other employees, helping build relationships within your organisation. The following people may well be involved in the process.

The employee’s Line Manager has the primary responsibility to identify the needs of the inductee and assess their learning styles as well as ensuring that the programme is followed through.

The Training/personnel dept, or whoever is responsible for training, needs to advise line managers, ensure training is provided, manage group events and oversee delivery of the programme.

Senior Managers, including the trustees, should be available to set out the vision of the organisation to new employees. Their involvement can help to motivate inductees by demonstrating the organisation’s concern that new employees feel they are an important part of the organisation. It will also help inductees see the ‘big picture’ in which their work takes place.

Specialists can provide specialist information on topics such as Health and Safety, quality measures, union representation etc.

Nominated peer/buddy can provide informal support and accelerate assimilation into the team/department by offering advice and information as needed....
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