Induction 2011

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Induction Portfolio

Candidate’s Name: Company: Date: Date of Completion:
Please write your name, in the blocks provided, as clear as possible. The date should be written in the DD/MM/YYYY format. V5.0211 © Redcrier Publications Limited 2011

Induction

glossary of words used in the refreshed common induction standards Additional guidance is given alongside the standards to explain some words and terminology used. However below are additional explanations relating to other terms referred to within the context of the standards.

Words used about people
Individual(s) Manager/Line Manager The person or people receiving care or support. The person who is directly responsible for supervising a worker, or who has responsibility for a workplace where one or more workers may visit or work. Looking at all the new work roles emerging in adult social care, this role might include someone (e.g. an individual receiving direct payments) instructing a personal assistant or a volunteer. “A carer spends a significant proportion of their life providing unpaid support to family or potentially friends. This could be caring for a relative, partner or friend who is ill, frail, disabled or has mental health or substance misuse problems.” (Source: Carers at the Heart of the 21st Century, DH 2008) Anyone who has a role caring for or supporting one or more individuals, having been recruited to that role through a social care sector organisation or an individual. A worker may be a paid employee, self-employed or a volunteer. The process of identifying future individual wishes and care preferences. This may or may not result in the recording these discussions in the form of an Advance Care Plan. A required document that sets out in detail the way daily care and support must be provided to an individual. Care plans may also be known as ‘plans of support’, ‘individual plans’, etc. An ongoing and planned learning process that contributes to personal and professional development and can be applied or assessed against competences and organisational performance. This can include the development of new knowledge, skills and competences. Comprehensive induction can be viewed as the initial building block of an ongoing CPD process. Skills for Care provides CPD support to adult social care employers and workers. These terms refer to the skills of reading, writing and handling numbers in various forms and at various levels. “Skills for Life” is the term used for ‘entry level’ skills, but you may find these terms used loosely and interchangeably. Considerable funding and support is available to help staff with these skills needs. See the Skills for Care website www.skillsforcare.org.uk/skillsforlife or www.scie-careskillsbase.org.uk for more details of essential resources in this area. Approaches to care planning and support which empower individuals to make the decisions about what they want to happen in their lives. These decisions then form the basis for any plans that are developed and implemented. This may have a different name but essentially it is a required document drawn up by a worker and line manager, setting out the learning needs, activities and qualification opportunities agreed as a route to develop the worker’s knowledge and skills over a stated period. Common Core Principles to Support Self Care – www.skillsforcare.org.uk/selfcare Raising concerns with appropriate authorities about the way care and support is being provided, such as practices that are dangerous, abusive, discriminatory or exploitative.

Carers

Worker

Words used about work and work documents
Advance Care Planning

Care plan

Continuing Professional Development (CPD)

Functional skills / Skills for Life

Person-centred approaches

Personal development plan

Self care Whistle blowing

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Induction

Words used about levels of knowledge
Be aware of Know / know how to Understand Recognise To know that something exists (e.g. legislation about...
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