Individual Work

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Individual work

The passage under analysis is taken from newspaper “Newsweek”. It is a newspaper (journalistic) article is written in publicistic style. This article is about reformation of the bank system. The main idea of the text is to show the readers that timely action from the side of Japan could help to built a healthy financial system. This article is impersonal and it’s function to inform the readers. The vocabulary used in this article is neutral and common literary. Specific features are:

• Special economic terms (bank loans, funds)
• Abbreviation (Corp.)
• Newspaper cliches ()
This text has headline. The main function of it’s to inform the reader briefly of what the news is to follow about. Syntactically headline is interrogative sentence. In the article we can find colloquial elements among them we find contracted form (it’s, won’t). We can find rhetorical question (Will Japan really force change on its elite institutions?). All this elements serve for render the official character of communication. To convey the main idea of article the author brings into play an abundance of expressive stylistic means and means of speech characterization.

Japan's Banks: Survival of the Fattest?
Japan has wasted nearly a decade refusing to attack its mountain of bad bank loans (metaphor). It has gone from wildly underestimating the size of the festering pile (synecdoche), to confessing that it is some 77 trillion yen ($546 billion) high, to admitting - under intense recent pressure from the United States - that it is indeed a health hazard (metonymy) for the other countries in its neighborhood. Last week Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto broke out the shovels, presenting a long-awaited plan for (epithet) cleaning up the mess. Now all he has to do is get his countrymen to put their backs into the job. The key element of the plan - expected to be adopted in a special legislative session at the end of the month - is the creation of so-called «bridge» banks, a tool for winding down insolvent institutions. Busted banks would be taken over by the new Financial Supervisory Agency, which would install new management and try to sell or merge them. Failing that, the banks would be run by the Heisei Financial (economic term) Restoration Corp. (abbreviation), usually for a maximum of two years, as bad loans are sold off.(simile) Public funds(economic term) would be injected to enable bridge banks to keep lending to creditworthy customers until they are shuttered. It's (contracted form) a plan Japan could use to build itself a modern, healthy financial system (epithet) - or to drag out the problem into the next century. The Tokyo stock market rose in anticipation of Hashimoto's announcement, then eased back on the recognition that the measures on the table won't (contracted form) necessarily force the biggest banks to offload their problem loans (economic terms). Will Japan really force change on its elite institutions? (rhetorical question) History isn't reassuring. («Newsweek», July 13,1998)

Read the following sentences and identify tropes or figures of speech in them. Write them down. Prove your point of view.

1. Hypocrisy is the most difficult and never-racking vice that any man can pursue; it needs an unceasing vigilance and rare detachment of spirit….it is a whole-time job. It is a asyndeton because it is an omission of the conjunctions that ordinarily join coordinate words or clauses.

2. Her mother is perfectly unbearable. Never met such a Gorgon." "I don't really know what a Gorgon is like, but I am quite sure, that Lady Bracknell is one. In any case, she is a monster without being a myth."(O.W.) It is personification because it is a trope in which human qualities or abilities are assigned to abstractions or inanimate objects.

And also it is antonomasia because it is a lexical SD in which a proper name is used instead of a common noun or...
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