Individual Ethical Perspective

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In an attempt to obtain a clearer awareness of my own ethical perspectives, I completed the Ethics Awareness Inventory. This inventory presented me with several questions into what I valued most and least as moral values. In addition, the inventory presented two sample situations involving ethical considerations from a management per-spective in a work environment. Through taking this inventory, I was able to gain an insight into how my values and perceptions could shape my actions and the impact of those actions in future circum-stances. This insight will allow me the benefit of choosing which ethical perspective best suits the individual situations as they present themselves and provides me with opportuni-ties to ask more key questions to serve the situations in a manner that is more true to my own ethical standards. These new tools will allow me to interact with peers and higher leadership in a more effective manner when it comes to ethical considerations and stands. Even though this survey gave me great insight into my own core beliefs, it also gave me an understanding of how other people may approach circumstances. This will be very beneficial when it comes to influencing any organization or social group's policies so that everyone is served in the best possible way. This paper will document the results of my participation in the ethical awareness inquiry and clarify which of the four main perspectives apply best to my moral beliefs. Then, each of the four ethical perspectives will be explained in order to provide you, the reader, with an understanding of how these differing perspectives shape individual ethical decisions and potential ethical dilemmas. To finalize the inquiry, potential ethical dilem-mas associated with my matching ethical perspective will be discussed. Ethics Awareness Inventory Scoring

MOST 38103
LEAST 4569
According to the Williams Institute for Ethics and Management in 2003, "the Eth-ics Awareness Inventory refers to a series of broad characterizations representing four prominent categories of ethical philosophy. The key word for each ethical philosophy category, Character, Obligation, Results, and Equity, represents a primary CORE value that forms a basis for ethical decision making within this ethical perspective." After an-swering these inventory questions, it is noted that my highest combined scores should in-dicate my personal perspective on ethics and the lowest score should show values that re-flect the least in my ethical views. The following table catalogs the scores received on December 16, 2007:

Based on these scores, my ethical perspective is most likely to match the Results Perspective description and least likely to be similar to the Equity Perspective descrip-tion. However, it is also recommended that I consider the idea that my individual per-spective is blended between the Results Perspective and the Obligation Perspective be-cause my highest combined scores are within one point of each other. Because of this blending of ethical perspectives, it was highly recommended that I "consider whether (a) you are experiencing an internal conflict in attempting to function in two distinguishable moral realms, or (b) your ethical style is a blend of two categories" (Williams Institute 2003). In considering these possibilities, I found a bit of both scenar-ios were applicable. While investigating these possibilities, it was interesting to see the transition of my ethical perspective over time. I could see how originally my ethical decisions reflected Equity Perspective traits in high school. Then it transitioned to reflect traits of the Character Perspective after I be-came a mother. Over the past seven years throughout my employment at my current job, my ethical behaviors definitely altered to primarily be of an obligatory nature and then results driven decisions due to changes in the...
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