India Super Power

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COMMUNICATION LAB

“WILL INDIA BECOME A SUPER POWER”

SUBMITTED BY,
J.KAVIYARASAN
REG.NO:44410205020,
IT- 3rd YEAR,
UCET.
More than sixty years ago, in the summer of 1948, the Indian nation, then newly-born, was struggling for its very survival. India is a unique and unlikely democratic state because it is not constructed according to the classical European principles of “ one language, one religion one common economy” .India contains an enormous diversity in language, religion and culture; and the state is not built on uniform nationalism, but embraces pluralism.

Few Indians now alive know how uncertain our future looked in the summer of 1948. The question then being asked everywhere was ‘Will India Survive? . Now, sixty-four years down the road, that fearful query has been replaced by a far more hopeful one, namely, ‘Will India Become a Superpower?’.

My vision as a citizen of India would be to make India a superpower, both in economic and military terms. The endeavour to be taken to herald this result would be tremendous and not without pain. One may wonder why India has not achieved this goal yet and what has prevented India from achieving this goal. Many reasons point back at us the root cause is paved by the citizens themselves. Too much focus is given on social and religious outputs which eventually lead to the election of leaders that are more focused on these aspects rather than on the economy and well-being of the country. On the other side of the coin, India faces more problems like proper infrastructure facilities, low agricultural output, high illiteracy rate and poverty.

Major factors which act as a barrier for India to become super power are..,

1. Population:
India’s increasing population is a big hindrance in India’s becoming a Super power. Rising population has affected the quality of life of the people for sure as imparting access of basic amenities and education to bigger population becomes more difficult. In the last several decades, fertility control policies in India have failed to promote a sustainable solution to the problem of overpopulation. India needs to take strict measures to counter the prevailing birth rate in the country.

2. Corruption:
India is one of the most corrupt countries on the world map. Corruption in India has assumed such large proportions that public have come to believe that it is impossible to get rid of this malaise. We need variety of strategies to fight corruption, ranging from the simplification of rules and procedures and the application of information technology to specific steps such as trapping corrupt public servants. Open and transparent political systems are must at all levels.

3. Decline of public institutions:
Key institutions like —politics, universities, judiciary, bureaucracy, police etc. are witnessing deterioration on the matter of accountability and productivity. In India, average incomes have risen fourfold and yet public institutions have not improved. Indian policy makers need to come up with number of public institutional reforms steps to counter this malaise. In India political parties are transformed into family firms in the past two decades. This result in nepotism; possibilities and success are dependent on one’s relationship with the ruling families. It causes the functional decline of public institution.

4. Naxal and Maoist menace :
Extremism in the form of the Naxalite movement has to be checked. Stern and sincere steps should be taken to rein in the menace. Rehabilitation programme has to be launched to bring the Naxalites into the mainstream and at the same time police force should be given modern training and equipments to counter ultras.

5. Social inequality and Unequal distribution of income across society: India needs to address growing unequal income distribution and need to narrow the gap between the poor and rich .The impressive growth...
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