Income from House Property

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Introduction
This lesson deals with income, which falls under the head ‘Income from house property’. The scope of income charged under this head is defined by section 22 of the Income Tax Act and the computation of income falling under this head is governed by sections 23 to 27. All the provisions relating to tax treatment of income from house property are explained in this lesson. Objectives

After going through this lesson, you will be able to understand: The meaning of house property
Who is treated as owner of house property?
The treatment of rental income from properties under different circumstances Determination of the annual value of a house property The expenses deductible from rental/notional income from house property Special treatment given to self-occupied house property Treatment of income/loss from house property.

Basis of Charge (Section 22)
The annual value of a property, consisting of any buildings or lands appurtenant thereto, of which the assessee is the owner, is chargeable to tax under the head ‘Income from house property’. However, if a house property, or any portion thereof, is occupied by the assessee, for the purpose of any business or profession, carried on by him, the profits of which are chargeable to income-tax, the value of such property is not chargeable to tax under this head. Thus, three conditions are to be satisfied for property income to be taxable under this head. The property should consist of buildings or lands appurtenant thereto. The assessee should be the owner of the property.

The property should not be used by the owner for the purpose of any business or profession carried on by him, the profits of which are chargeable to income-tax. Applicability of Section 22

Buildings or lands appurtenant thereto
approach roads to and from public streets, compounds, courtyards, backyards, playgrounds, kitchen garden, motor garage, stable or coach home, cattle-shed etc, attached to and forming part of the building. In respect of non-residential buildings, the appurtenant lands may be in the form of car-parking spaces, roads connecting one department with another department, playgrounds for the benefit of employees, etc. Ownership of house property

Deemed Owner
If an individual transfers a house property to his or her spouse (except in connection with an agreement to live apart) or to a minor child (except a married daughter) without adequate consideration, he is deemed as the owner of the property for tax purposes. However, if an individual transfers cash to his or her spouse or minor child, and the transferee acquires a house property out of the gifted amount, the transferor shall not be treated as the deemed owner of the house property. The holder of an Impartible Estate is deemed to be the owner of all the properties comprised in the estate. A member of a co-operative society, company or association of persons, to whom a property (or a part thereof) is allotted or leased under a house building scheme of the society, company or association, is deemed to be the owner of such property. A person who has acquired a property under a power of attorney transaction, by satisfying the conditions of section 53A of the Transfer of Property Act, that is under a written agreement, the purchaser has paid the consideration or is ready to pay the consideration and has taken the possession of the property, is the deemed owner of the property, although he may not be the registered owner. A person who has acquired a right in a building (under clause (f) of section 269UA), by way of a lease for a term of not less than 12 years (whether fixed originally or extended through a provision in the agreement), is the deemed owner of the property. This provision does not cover any right by way of a lease renewable from month to...
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