In What Ways Did the Arrival of the Spanish, French, and British Change the Culture and Lifestyles of the Indian Cultures in North America, Central America, and South America?

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 207
  • Published : July 9, 2007
Open Document
Text Preview
The life styles of the Indians of the Americas changed greatly over time, almost completely influenced by Western culture. Each of the different Western civilizations affected the Indian tribes very differently. This is partly due to the reasons why they came to the "New World." The British came primarily for land due to their fast population growth and partially for a new economic venture. The French came for furs and luxuries that only Indians and the untamed land could provide. They created trading posts and shipped these commodities back to the mainland. The Spanish came for conquest. They wanted gold, land, slaves, and glory. Each of these different purposes contributed to how the corresponding civilization interacted with the Indians. The British primarily interacted with the Indian tribes along the eastern shorelines of North America. The British, unlike the French, only relied on the Indians during early settling. They harsh climates and geographies of the lands the British settlers were landing in were unlike anything they had ever known. They slowly became friends with local Indian tribes who taught them how to plant, and survive in the winter. These relationships slowly changed as the settlers learned how to survive on their own, and as these settlements prospered the animosity between settlers and Indians grew more and more. The relationships changed from a friendly relationship to a trade relationship. The Indians would give food and luxuries in exchange for the British settler's guns, ammunition, and metal pots. They even converted some Indians to their faiths, and some went as far as living with the settlers. As more settlers arrived for live in the "New World" there was a need for more land, and a need to claim land granted in the British King's "Royal Charters." These charters were essentially land grants given to settlers and companies who were to move to the "New World." Local Indian tribes were often already settled on these...
tracking img