In the Letter from Charles Lamb to English Romantic Poet William Wordsworth

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  • Topic: Rhetoric, William Wordsworth, Romanticism
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  • Published : February 13, 2011
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LETTER FROM CHARLES LAMB
In the letter from Charles Lamb to English romantic poet William Wordsworth, Charles sends a very kind invitation into Cumberland to William. I am asked to analyze the techniques the author (William) uses to decline Charles’s invitation. The author is trying to inform Charles Lamb that he will not be able to accept the invitation by using mainly persuasion, exposition, Pathos argument, Figurative speech, some description, compliments and past memories to inform Charles that he can not accept the invitation.

The author starts by telling Charles that he is honored by the invitation by the quote, “With you and your Sister I could gang anywhere.” He then gives the bad new that he can not accept the invitation, “But I am afraid whether I shall ever be able to afford so desperate a Journey.” Therefore the author gives a compliment before giving the bad news to Charles. The quote, “The rooms where I was born…….. When I have sunned myself, my old school, -these are my mistresses.” The author uses Figurative speech and persuasion to try and change Charles point of view on why he (William) cannot accept the invitation, the author tries to persuade him that he cannot go not because he doesn’t want to, but because he can’t. The quote, “Your sun & moon and skies and hills & lakes affect me no more, or scarcely come to me in more venerable characters, than as a gilded room with tapestry and tapers, where I might live with handsome visible objects”, shows that the author used personification and figurative speech.

Another technique the author uses is Exposition, the author informs, explains, and clarifies his/her ideas and thoughts. The author uses Exposition in the quote, “Separate from the pleasure of your company, I don't much care if I never see a mountain in my life. I have passed all my days in London, until I have formed as many and intense local attachments, as any of your Mountaineers can have done with dead nature”, by writing to...
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