In Memoriam

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In Memoriam (Tennyson) vs Because I Could Not Stop for Death (Dickinson) [Name of Student]
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In Memoriam (Tennyson) vs Because I Could Not Stop for Death (Dickinson)

Thesis Statement

In this paper we will be analysing two brilliant works of poetry, one In Memoriam by Tennyson as compared to Because I Could Not Stop for Death by Dickinson. We will analyse both the works in terms of their content, form and style and evaluate how they have been done by their respective writers.

Discussion
In Memoriam
Content
The poem is not, nonetheless, merely a way to express personal grief. Even though the “I” of In Memoriam is at times totally linked with the poet. Tennyson, the poet himself alleged that it is recurrently proposed to symbolize how the human race expresses and communicates through him. The individual sorrow and uncertainty became a microcosm for the distress being beared by the men and women of the 19th century who had been moving away from faith in traditional religion, as the evolvements in science were getting on to the ending that as such there was no divine hand which existed to guide. The speaker actually gets troubled through the loss he has beared but he gradually consents to the notion that, regardless of the external signs of confusion, and disorder the world actually becoming a better place to live in; his friend Hallam enters in to be seen as a messenger of a superior reace which will show way to humankind to lead them to God. Tennyson shifts alternately from insensitive misery to self-awareness and gets too see that writing poetry is an antidote for pain. Poems 9 through 17 make up a cluster amalgamated by the poet’s thought on the arrival of Hallam’s body through the ship from Italy. A calmer anguish now encompasses his heart. This anguish due to grief gradually make the mind even firmer, but the more deeper the sorrows are than words keep closed within in his heart. He commences on not to display his emotions openly but as he should (Richard, 2004). As a consequence, In Memoriam portrays the chief Victorian clash of science and faith to be the true work of its era; Tennyson’s effort to settle any sort of doubts that are based on religion which take birth from his not public sorrow and the outcomes of pre-Darwinian theories which are associated to succession were cut down by thinkers of his time as a reasonable landmark. The cyclic modification in the turn from personal anguish and desolation to the bigger vision of the public and apprehension for wider, social problems that can be seen in this poem reveal Tennyson’s mounting reception of and settlement with the issues of his age. As the elegy gets to its ending, the poet becomes more strongly influenced. His love, even though was seen on their preceding earthly association, is “vaster passion” which is now that Hallam’s incidence is spiritual and subtle through God and nature. The elegy ends up with the self-assured statement of the poet which shows that the living are real and will supplementarily move humanity’s measures and of the faith in its real sense that will not be highlighted only after death.

Form
The poem is not, nonetheless, merely a way to express personal grief. Even though the “I” of In Memoriam is at times totally linked with the poet. Tennyson, the poet himself alleged that it is recurrently proposed to symbolize how the human race expresses and communicates through him. The individual sorrow and uncertainty became a microcosm for the distress being beared by the men and women of the 19th century who had been moving away from faith in traditional religion, as the evolvements in science were getting on to the ending that as such there was no divine hand which existed to guide. The speaker actually gets troubled through the loss he has beared but he gradually consents to the notion that, regardless of the external signs of confusion, and disorder the world actually becoming a...
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