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In allegorical novel called “Animal Farm” by George Orwell

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In allegorical novel called “Animal Farm” by George Orwell

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In allegorical novel called “Animal Farm” by George Orwell, an interesting idea that was worth learning about is how power can corrupt an individual. Animal Farm tells us about the Rebellion of animals against humans. The Rebellion is a great success and pigs, being the most intelligent animals, take control. However, as time goes on, life of other animals becomes worse and worse while pigs prosper. Orwell based this book of Russian communism and used Stalin as prototype for Napoleon. He also tries to demonstrate that once a person has complete power, that individual will become corrupt and will do anything in order to maintain it. Orwell wanted this novel to be a warning for future societies as in the novel, Napoleon slaughters the ones who openly oppose him and uses different methods of psychological manipulation and physical threat in order to maintain his leadership. Napoleon attempts to maintain his power by threatening animals physically, even slaughtering them. For instance, Napoleon slaughtered four pigs that had opposed him when he abolished the Sunday Meetings. Napoleon killed them using his dogs because they were questioning and criticizing his decisions and leadership. If that continued, other animals would start to analyse the situation and come to the conclusion that Napoleon was in fact a poor and corrupted leader. Napoleon could not let this happen, so he murdered the pigs because “they confessed that they had been secretly in touch with Snowball ever since the expulsion, that they had collaborated with him in destroying the windmill, and that they had entered into an agreement with him to hand over Animal Farm to Mr Frederick”. Of course, Napoleon also murdered the three hens (that had been the ringleaders in the attempted rebellion over the eggs) after they stated that “Snowball had appeared to them in a dream and incited them to disobey Napoleon’s orders”. However, it is obvious that Napoleon simply decided to get rid of all opposition. Mass...