Improvisation Et Caprice Presentation

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September 13, 2011

By Eugène Bozza

Saxophone Studio Presentation
Presented by Robby Avila

“The good man is the only excellent musician, because he gives forth a perfect harmony not with a lyre or other instrument but with the whole of his life.” - Plato

Eugène Bozza (4 April 1905 – 28 September 1991)
Eugène Bozza was a 20th century French musician and talented composer who wrote many important works for not only the saxophone, but for nearly every wind instrument. He was born in Nice on the 4th of April 1905. He studied the arts of composition, conducting, and playing the violin at the Paris Conservatoire. There, he won the Prix de Rome for his work La legend de Roukmani, a cantata based on an Indian legend. After completing his course of study in Paris, he moved to Valenciennes, where he would become the director of the École Nacionale de Musique. There he would remain until his retirement in 1975. Although retired from his major teaching career, he was still an active composer until his death in Valenciennes on the 28th of September 1991. Very gifted in the art of music, he has proven himself to be a highly prolific composer with very important works for many instruments (See outline for a list of the pieces composed for saxophone alone). Although he primarily known for his solo and chamber works, he also composed five symphonies, operas, and ballets. Unfortunately, his larger works are rarely played outside of France.

Improvisation et Caprice (1952)
Written by Eugène Bozza in 1952, this piece is dedicated to the professor of saxophone at the Paris Conservatoire, Marcel Mule, a great French saxophonist and model for saxophone playing. The piece is a challenging work, pushing students with demands of musicality, technique, tone, and rhythm. Not uncommon amongst composers, Bozza often “plagiarized” from himself, borrowing ideas he had used in earlier works to aid in the composition of a newer one. The Improvisation...
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