Important Aspects of Hrmd

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Contents
Important aspects of Human Resource Development1
Introduction3
Motivation4
Incentive theory of motivation4
Drive theory of motivation4
Abraham Maslow (Hierarchy of Needs)4
Goal setting6
Benefits of goal setting6
Importance of goal setting in TASCO7
Incentives7
Case of McDonald’s8
Case of TOYOTA8
Disabled person employment9
Career design form9
Toyota child care bubu land9
Reference9
Personal learning log11

Introduction
Human resource management is a very large area of knowledge and performance. The areas in human resource development are interdisciplinary. This interdisciplinary nature influences human resource development because of the inter-relationship between the departments within the organization. (Jacobs. 1990). There are many theories in the past which define HRD and each theory is based upon some theme, through these themes HRD can be identified. The concept of HRD was introduced in 1970 when L.Nadler defined HRD as 'a series of organized activities conducted within a specified time and designed to produce behavioural change’. (L. Nadler. 1970)

In this definition Nadler’s key focus is on the changing behaviour of the organizational members. In 1976 Craig refined this definition by also focusing on the goal of developing human potential through lifelong learning. In the same way Jones states the idea of systematic development done through the work of people in achieving personal and organizational goals. These justification and themes tells us that HRD is continuously developing with the passage of time. Nowadays HRD has become the combination of different factors involved in the development of the organization. The three aspects of human resource development which are the most important to any organization are: * Motivation

* Goal setting
* Incentives
Motivation
According to Wikipedia Motivation is a expression that is related to a process which, sustains, controls, and elicits certain behaviours. For example: a person eats to fulfill his hunger. Motivational theories that explain the word motivation are as follows. Incentive theory of motivation

This theory states that people perform because they want to get rewarded. Behaviour learning is linked with the association and reinforcement (of reward) and it is very important in the concept of motivation (Edward E,Lawler. 1973:112-114) This theory states that there are many needs which every person wants to fulfill including emotional or biological. Usually these needs are linked with monetary incentives when people know that they will be rewarded after the completion of the task. They work hard to accomplish this task. Most of organizations are using this theory to motivate their employees because it gives better results as compared to other techniques, Drive theory of motivation

Drive theory elaborates that people perform to decrease their internal tensions which are developed when the needs of other people are not fulfilled. For example you drink water to fulfill your thirst (About.com). This theory is different from the incentive theory because it has not concerned the monetary rewards. Its main focus is on the feelings and inner behavior of the individual. The reflection of all the classical theories can be seen in the motivational model of Abraham Maslow. He presented his model in 1954 in his book Motivation and Personality. Abraham Maslow (Hierarchy of Needs)

Maslow’s model was not fully accepted by the people but it acquired a lot of attention. According to his theory every person wants to satisfy his needs and the person gives importance to those needs which are more important in his view. These needs come in the specific order. Next need comes after the completion of previous need. Maslow’s gave the following order for these needs. Physiological need, then Belongingness needs, then Safety needs, then esteems needs and at the end Self actualization. In 1958 Dubin describes...
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