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Importance of Blitzkrieg in Wwii

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Importance of Blitzkrieg in Wwii

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  • March 17, 2005
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World War II spawned the creation of many new inventions, inventions that were greatly needed in order for whole countries to survive the war, and one such creation was introduced by the Germans, the Blitzkrieg. The word "Blitzkrieg" is German for "lightning war," and it describes the military tactic used by the Germans and was coined by Western newspapermen in 1939 to convey the immense speed and powerful destruction caused by the three week German campaign against Poland. The term Blitzkrieg is mainly used to describe German tactics, however the general tactic itself was not entirely unique to only the Germans. The lightning quick method was used whenever the opportunity presented itself, particularly by the forces under the command of General Patton. In analyzing the German utilization of this "lightning war" tactic it becomes clearer how much of an intricate role the Blitzkrieg played in the Second World War, and how it could have completely succeeded.

Blitzkrieg was a fast and open style of warfare, heavily reliant on new technologies. First aircraft were used as long-range artillery to destroy enemy strongholds, attack troop concentrations, and spread panic. Then combined arms forces of tanks and motorized infantry coordinated by two-way radio destroyed tactical targets before moving on, deep into enemy territory. A key difference to previous tactical models was the devolution of command. Fairly novice officers in the field were encouraged to use their own initiative, rather than rely on a centralized command structure. Essentially, the idea behind Blitzkrieg was organizing troops into mobile forces with exceptional communications and command, being able to keep the onslaught up as the battle unfolded, and basically the plan was to concentrate all available forces at a single spot in front of the enemy lines, and then break a hole in it with artillery and infantry. Once the hole was opened, tanks could rush through and strike hundreds of miles...