Implementing and Ehr

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The Future Mandate: Implementation of an EHR
Darhlene E. Banks
The Catholic University of America
HIT-573, Health Care Information Systems
Dr. Sue Yeon Syn
October 30, 2012

Abstract
In evaluating the plans of the Leonard Williams Medical Center (LWMC) and its subsidiary business entity, the Williams Medical Services (WMS), the overall objective is to implement new technology in the form of an Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system in order to streamline workflow, provide safe and quality care for patients and remain competitive with other healthcare facilities in providing these components with the use of advanced technology. The implementation of an EMR is the desire of the physician group, WMS, who refuses to listen to the advice of the CIO and IT staff to implement a new system. But, the hospital has already been approved to implement a computerized physician order entry (CPOE) system. However, one major problem that LWMC presently faces is the lack of communication between its IT division and its tertiary specialty division, WMS. Before implementing any IT system, all interested entities must communicate and reach a workable conclusion; so that, a plan of action can be derived that will lead to a beneficial action plan for all. An Electronic Health Record (EHR) is a more robust system to adopt in order to meet the goals of this organization. An introduction of the many benefits of an EHR will create a working relationship that will have all stakeholders interested in its adoption as a measurable plan.

The Future Mandate: Implementation of an Electronic Health Record

INTRODUCTION
The CEO of the Leonard Williams Medical Center, 240-bed acute care hospital, is deeply concerned about how the physicians of his tertiary medical facility will proceed with implementing an Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system without the consent and advisement of the CIO and the IT staff of his facilities, who are highly regarded in the community. His concerns are whether the EMR will connect with their existing systems and be operable with their future IT plans. The physicians may want to proceed independently because they want to move ahead with changing into electronic records and feel that the IT team is moving too slow to adopt the plan which will allow them to provide optimum care for their patients. However, implementing an EMR will be ineffective without the interest of all stakeholders, so the CEO must step in to resolve this and bring all parties in alignment with a cooperative plan. The IT committee has already approved a plan to acquire a computerized physician order entry system (CPOE) perhaps to bring their facility up to par as an entity to alleviate errors in medication dispensing, but the physicians perhaps want to rid themselves of having to fumble through paper charts and swiftly move to electronic data; in order to render quality care to their patients. The overall goals of each group is primarily the same, but it may be for selfish reasons to employ the technologies of one's own interest first. Nevertheless, the role of each information system is plausible and the CEO can intercede by having a meeting of all department heads, a spokesperson for the physicians group, the nurses, the laboratory head, the radiology department, the pharmacy, and of course the CIO and IT staff committee. These people are all key players in maintaining the hospitals status as a premier institute to employ EHR and IT services in the organization. Because both entities want to employ advanced technology to provide care, an electronic health record system would be the best fit to resolve the problems at hand.

IT and Healthcare

The healthcare industry is under increasing pressure to utilize IT in an effort to reduce process inefficiencies, control spiraling healthcare cost, and improve the quality of patient care (Edwards, Maloney,Jacko,2008). An EHR is a large-scale system that is complex and...
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