Impact of M-Commerce in Job Market

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A.Ruby Mary



A host of new location-aware applications and services are emerging with significant implications for the future of e-commerce. With the more than one billion cellular phones in the world in 2002, joined by other wireless handheld computing devices like personal digital assistants (PDAs) and pocket PCs, there are significant opportunities for mobile commerce growth. Although mobile commerce enables access to goods and buyer and seller is critical to the transaction. Much like the experience with the era, however, the development of location-based services has fallen somewhat short of expectations. Here I, make an attempt to provide a realistic assessment of the potential for location based services, examining the market opportunity, technological origins, likely services, emerging policy issues, and potential future directions.

The advent of wireless and mobile technology has created both new opportunities and new challenges for the business community. In its present state, M-Commerce can be viewed as an extension of conventional, Internet-based E-Commerce, which adds a different mode of network and accommodates different end users’ characteristics. However, if the predictions stating that mobile and wireless computing will dominate the Internet industry in the future materialize, the E-Commerce and M-Commerce could become a singular blended entity. M-Commerce, as defined by Muller and Veerse, stands for conducting commercial transactions via a “mobile” telecommunications network using a communication, information, and payment (CIP) device such as a mobile phone or a palmtop unit. In a broader sense, M-Commerce can simply be defined as exchanging products, ideas and services between mobile users and providers. This paper will also give an overview of the characteristics of M-Commerce. We discuss the basic characteristics of M-Commerce that have the potential to influence the basic marketing orientation of both sellers and buyers, and, above all, alter the general dynamics of the market.

There are many definitions of m-commerce with differing emphases. Keen and Mackintosh define m-commerce as the extension of electronic commerce from wired to wireless computers and telecommunications, and from fixed locations to anytime, anywhere, and anyone. when something is mobile it means that its primary usage environment is a mobile one. On the other hand, mobility in itself and mobile technology is not necessarily a value; the freedom created and supported with the technology is the key issue. Durlacher define m-commerce as “any transaction with a monetary value that is conducted via a mobile telecommunication network”. The focus in this definition lies on the exchange of products and services that is associated with a monetary value. They specifically list any kind of service that can be provided by the mobile device, thus expanding the mere commercial character through communicative and informative services. A mobile device is a small smart device. It can be a mobile phone, a communicator or a PDA. It communicates and transfers data (convenience). It is used only by its owner (personalization). It can provide information anytime, anywhere (ubiquity). Capturing the concept of mobility, a user can be contacted anywhere (reachability). A mobile device can provide users´ locations (localization). Knowledge of users´ precise geographical location allows customized, relevant content to be delivered to them when and where they need it. It can also be used to connect to the Internet (instant connectivity). Ubiquitous interactivity (figure 1) is what makes mobile devices unique. Wireless devices enable users to send, receive, and act on information in real-time, independent of their location.


The western mobile and remote workforce is growing, driven by both business necessity...
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