Impact of Ww1 on America

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Impacts of WW1 on America

Impacts of World War one on America
The total number of casualties in WW1 which lasted only from 1914 to 1919 came to a terrifying height of 37,508,686 of that number only 323,018 belonged to the U.S. World war one had many effects on the United States including weapons advancement, change in the workforce and economy, and women’s rights.

The first and one of the most important impacts of ww1 on America is the weapons advancement. Tanks were one of the many inventions that aided the battle in world war one. The tank was not invented by just one person unlike various other inventions in the past. The first tank was constructed in 1899 and boasted an engine by Daimler, a bullet-proof casing and armed with two revolving machine guns developed by Hiram Maxim. It was offered to the British army but was later dismissed as of little use and was deemed by Lord Kitchener as a “pretty mechanical toy”. Developments continued despite the harsh words used by Kitchener. Colonel Swinton reopened the designs and pushed the project and eventually convinced Winston Churchill to sponsor it. With luck, determination, and pressure the first combat ready tank rolled off the line a little over a year after the war officially started. The tank was given the nickname “little Willie” weighing in at 14 tons, bearing 12 foot long tracks, and a top speed of 3 miles per hour. The problem with the tank was that it could not cross the trenches and could only reach 2 miles per hour in the rough terrain of war. The conditions inside the tank were unbearable and temperatures could sky rocket. The fumes alone were enough to choke a man. Thanks to the great enthusiasm of Col. Swinton the tank was modified and aided in the victory of many battles making the tank a great weapon of world war one. Another invention that took place in WW1 was the machine gun. The first Machine gun in 1914 invented by Hiram Maxim...
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