Impact of Print Advertisement of Dengue

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  • Topic: Dengue fever, Aedes, Mosquito
  • Pages : 3 (873 words )
  • Download(s) : 48
  • Published : January 15, 2013
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Impact of print advertisement of dengue

Introduction
Dengue fever is an infectious disease carried by mosquitoes and caused by any of four related dengue viruses. This disease used to be called "break-bone" fever because it sometimes causes severe joint and muscle pain that feels like bones are breaking. Health experts have known about dengue fever for more than 200 years. Transmission

Dengue virus can be transmitted from the bite of an infected Aedes mosquito. Mosquitoes become infected when they bite infected humans, and can later transmit the infection to other people. Two main species of mosquito, Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus, have been responsible for all cases of dengue transmitted in Mexico. Dengue cannot be transmitted from person to person without a mosquito as the intermediate vector. Symptoms:

Symptoms of typical uncomplicated (classic) dengue usually start with fever within 4 to 7 days after you have been bitten by an infected mosquito. These symptoms include: high fever, up to 105ºF, severe headache, retro-orbital (behind the eye) pain, severe joint and muscle pain, nausea and vomiting, and rash. The rash may appear over most of the body 3 to 4 days after the fever begins, and then subsides after 1 to 2 days. There may be a second rash a few days later. Symptoms of dengue hemorrhagic fever include all of the symptoms of classic dengue plus bleeding from the nose, gums, or under the skin, causing purplish bruises, which results from damage to blood vessels. This form of dengue disease can cause death.

Dengue in Past:
* In medical history the first recorded case of probable Dengue fever is in Chinese medical encyclopedia from the Jin Dynasty in some (265-420-)AD. Which referred to “water poison” with flying insect. * The most plausible early reports of dengue epidemics are from 1779-1780 when epidemics swept Asia, Africa, and north America. * In 1906, transmission by aedes mosquitos was confirmed and in 1907 , dengue was the...
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