Impact of Europeans on Native Americans

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Change in a New World

Like many countries who have been invaded by a foreign power, Native Americans are also regarded to have been subjected to significant change. When the Europeans first arrived in the late 1400s, they brought with them the intent of not only exploring to find India, but also to find gold and much more wealth. The Europeans made a mistake in their navigation causing them not to arrive in India, but rather what they referred to as the “New World.” The Europeans had stumbled upon the Native Peoples that occupied that place. The Native Peoples were soon to become overpowered and eventually become slaves of the Europeans. With the Europeans now being part of the Native world, they eventually left a significant impact, an impact that affected them influentially, ethnocentrically, and population-wise.

One of the ways the Europeans left a cultural impact on the Native Americans is that they decreased the population significantly. One of the ways that the Europeans decreased the Native population was through the spread of foreign diseases. Some of the diseases they spread were small pox, influenza, and measles. The Native Americans had no immunity whatsoever when those diseases plagued them so it lead to terrible suffering then eventually death. Another cause in the decrease in the Native Peoples population was the displacement of many Native Americans. An example of displacement would be the Indian Removal Act of 1830. Although this event took place a while after Europeans the arrived in the “New World,” it was still influenced later on after the colonizing of America. This led to the killing of many Native Americans in similar events that took place if they were not compliant with new laws that were implemented after the colonizing of America. These are just some of the ways on how the Europeans left a cultural impact by decreasing the Native population.

On a much more psychological aspect of European impact on the Native Peoples was...