Impact of Advertisement

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Advertising
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This article is about the form of communication. For other uses, see Advertiser (disambiguation). "Adverts" redirects here. For the English punk band, see The Adverts. For content guidelines on the use of advertising in Wikipedia articles, see Wikipedia:Spam. For a proposal on advertising about Wikipedia, see Wikipedia:Advertisements.

A Coca-Cola advertisement from the 1890s
Marketing|
Key concepts|
* Product marketing * Pricing * Distribution * Service * Retail * Brand management * Account-based marketing * Ethics * Effectiveness * Research * Segmentation * Strategy * Activation * Management * Dominance * Marketing operations| Promotional contents|

* Advertising * Branding * Underwriting spot * Direct marketing * Personal sales * Product placement * Publicity * Sales promotion * Sex in advertising * Loyalty marketing * Mobile marketing * Premiums * Prizes| Promotional media|

* Printing * Publication * Broadcasting * Out-of-home advertising * Internet * Point of sale * Merchandise * Digital marketing * In-game advertising * Product demonstration * Word-of-mouth * Brand ambassador * Drip marketing * Visual merchandising| * v * t * e|

Advertising is a form of communication for marketing and used to encourage or persuade an audience (viewers, readers or listeners; sometimes a specific group) to continue or take some new action. Most commonly, the desired result is to drive consumer behavior with respect to a commercial offering, although political and ideological advertising is also common. In Latin, ad vertere means “to turn the mind toward.” [1] The purpose of advertising may also be to reassure employees or shareholders that a company is viable or successful. Advertising messages are usually paid for by sponsors and viewed via various traditional media; including mass media such as newspaper, magazines, television commercial, radio advertisement, outdoor advertising or direct mail; or new media such as blogs, websites or text messages. Commercial advertisers often seek to generate increased consumption of their products or services through "branding," which involves the repetition of an image or product name in an effort to associate certain qualities with the brand in the minds of consumers. Non-commercial advertisers who spend money to advertise items other than a consumer product or service include political parties, interest groups, religious organizations and governmental agencies. Nonprofit organizations may rely on free modes of persuasion, such as a public service announcement (PSA). Modern advertising was created with the innovative techniques introduced with tobacco advertising in the 1920s, most significantly with the campaigns of Edward Bernays, which is often considered the founder of modern, Madison Avenue advertising.[1][2][3] In 2010, spending on advertising was estimated at $142.5 billion in the United States and $467 billion worldwide [4] Internationally, the largest ("big four") advertising conglomerates are Interpublic, Omnicom, Publicis, and WPP.[citation needed] Contents * 1 History * 1.1 19th century * 1.2 20th century * 1.2.1 On the radio from the 1920s * 1.2.2 Public service advertising in WW2 * 1.2.3 Commercial television in the 1950s * 1.2.4 Media diversification in the 1960s * 1.2.5 Cable tv from the 1980s * 1.2.6 On the internet from the 1990s * 2 Advertising theory * 2.1 Hierarchy of effects model * 2.2 Marketing mix * 3 Types of advertising * 4 Sales promotions * 5 Media and advertising approaches * 5.1 Rise in new media * 5.2 Niche marketing * 5.3 Crowdsourcing * 5.4 Global advertising * 5.5 Foreign public messaging * 5.6 Diversification * 5.7 New technology * 5.8...
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