Immigration to the United States

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Immigration
Michelle Reid HS5401 September, 14, 2012

Table of Contents

Abstract……………………………………………………………………………..3 Introduction………………………………………………………………………....4 Immigration Timeline………………………………………………………………4 Immigration Acts…………………………………………………………………...5 United States Citizenship…………………………………………………………...8 Effects on America…………………………………………………………………9 The New America…………………………………………………………………10 References…………………………………………………………………………13

Abstract

In this essay, I will concentrate my focus on U.S. immigration. The material to be discussed will include a shortened immigration timeline, important Acts of Congress regarding immigration, what is needed to become a U.S. citizen, important recognition of immigrant groups and their positive effect on America, and what the new 21st Century America is like concerning immigration. America’s immigration policies continue to change over time. Issues that frame such policies include the immigrant’s role in the labor force, rates of immigration to the U.S., and most recently the concerns about terrorism. The main question to consider is do these policies offer fairness in terms of their consideration of immigrants and benefits to the citizens of the United States.

I.) Introduction

For the countless that immigrated to the United States throughout the late 19th to early 20th century, most led a new beginning to a flourishing life. Nonetheless, there were many regulations and laws past to place a limit on the entry of immigrants; some were due prejudice while others were needed to keep the United States safe. As time went on, the 20th century, there were laws revoking the older immigration decrees and laws making it feasible for many more aliens to immigrate to the United States. Regardless of the new regulations and laws that barred the previous ones, no individual can just enter the United States and become a citizen. An individual who seeks U.S. citizenship must go through numerous assessments and tests before they can achieve their residency.

II.) Immigration Timeline

1607-1830: The Scotch-Irish that had been operating on farms that they were not the owners. When they were unable to afford to rent their homes, they had no option but to seek a new residence. Those that were the poorest faced starvation if they did not escape. Africans were brought unwillingly. As slaves to work on plantations, all ages and genders were brought, they composed the lowest social class. They were forced to come here and work on plantations as slaves.

1830-1890: The Irish and British came to America during this time period. The “Irish came for several reasons; the potato food crisis that killed over one million” (Immigration Timeline, n.d.), resentment for the British rule of their country, British Protestantism and British taxes. Along with these circumstances, there was the beginning of long-drawn-out depression and social adversity. The British that came to America did not face the same dire circumstances as the Irish. The British came to merely look for better prospects of social class. The Irish mostly became tenant farmers and the British were mostly professionals, self-governing farmers, and skilled workers.

From 1890-1924, immigration was voluntary. The ethnicities included “Greeks, Jewish, Russian Jews, Slavs, Eastern Orthodox, Armenians, Eastern European Jews, and many middle-upper class Christians from numerous countries” (Gabaccia, 2002). The United States, in the 19th Century, continued to be a...
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