Imagery in Poems

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 53
  • Published : May 30, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Jordan Friedman
Mrs. Kashmer
English Period: 4
5-29-13
Writing to Compare Literary Works

The following poems set a great example of imagery. The poet’s use of imagery adds to the meaning of each poem. Imagery describes a poem’s true meaning with the five senses.
The images of blackberries help me understand the poet’s ideas within the words because of its vivid details. The visual images in line two have a clear picture of blackberry bushes filled with berries. Each adjective is like berry after berry, selected, plucked and popped into your mouth. The repetition of "black blackberries" tries to show you the greatness of the berries being so delicious. The line stating “stalks very prickly," shows the sharpness of the bushes. Black is said many times and shows the true meaning with each vivid detail. It seems noticed as a color, and then imports the image of its juicy ripeness, then gathers magical. As the poet shows each word like you’re experiencing it yourself. Line 10, “strengths" and "squinched" are have alliteration to more vivid detail towards the poem. The chill of the repeated "icy" repeats along with “berries” to show how using the same two words show the greatness of imagery.

The images help me understand the speaker’s affection for ordinary things because of the vibrant understanding with each line. The imagery the author gives these poems differs. In “Daily,” the author uses more positives words and feelings to describe how the woman in the poem is feeling.

*daily#2
The images of Sokoya help me understand the speaker’s feeling for her aunt because of the detailed use of language she uses.
*sokoya#2
In conclusion, these poems set an abundant amount of detail using imagery. The poet’s meaning for each poem sets a better example of getting its true meaning and main point across to readers.
tracking img