Illusion of Life

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A short essay :
The Pearl by John Steinbeck

Illusion of Life
Remember when we’re young and innocent, we believed that fairies were real and they would do everything we asked of them? Or disney world was our favorite place to gobecaus eit was the ‘magic’ world? If we ever wondered why, that’s because Disney indirect plan of illusion through al the movies was so strong that it caused us to belive everything that we sa as real. It was difficult to distinguish between imagination and reality. Not only in our life, but illusion also played a big role in a classic literature. The Pearl by John Steinbeck brings deceit, derails people from their real purpose by harming one’s faith, and shows true human nature. Shimmering sunshine on the ocean, glowing moonlight on the lake, may humble us with its beauty. But hidden under the surface may be an ugly layer of sludge. Steinbeck shows that appearances can be deceiving. The first time Kino finds the pearl of the world, it looks “beautiful, rich, and warm and lovely, glowing and gloating and triumphant” (Steinbeck 19). It promises any dreams that Kino could think of. Then his happiness is soon diluted. Kino lost everything, even his baby. After that, the great pearl change to “ugly; it was gray, like a malignant growt” (Steinbeck 89). The pearl that he tought valuable brought nothing but suffering. Things are not always what they appear to be. The doctor that refused to cure Coyotito (Kino’s son)the first time, suddenly comes to Kino’s house and “took the baby and examined it and felt his head” (Steinbeck 34). People in the brush house tink that the doctor only came to cure the baby. But he brought along a veiled intent with him. He wanted Kino to pay him with the great pearl because he saved Coyotito’s life. Not only the doctor, but shadows of illusion also fly to the pearl buyer in town. He tried to cheat Kino “while the rest of his face smiled in greeting” (Steinbeck 48). Pretending to be nice and not knowing about...
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