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Illiteracy in America

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Illiteracy in America is still one of the most prevalent issues in our society today. The key to solving this issue falls upon our educational system and its counterparts. I think that if our country focuses on what it seems to be lacking in education, illiteracy can possibly be solved. It is very unfortunate that illiteracy has not been dispelled. Unfortunately, illiteracy has increased significantly. According to the National Right to Read Foundation, an incomprehensible 42 million Americans cannot read, write or perform simple math. Another 50 million Americans cannot read past the 4th grade level. The question still arises, “How can illiteracy be prevented in America”? I think it is a travesty that America’s youth have to endure the hardships of becoming successful in this country without a proper education. Without a proper foundation in education one cannot reach the plateau of their potential to become someone of great value in today’s society. Illiteracy can hinder that potential greatness in someone. I think it is commendable that President Obama has tried to focus on the need for more adequate education in our country. Too many of our children are falling by the wayside concerning reading and writing. The question arises, “how is illiteracy defined”? There are two definitions that have been used in textbooks and other resources. The first is conventional literacy, which is realized when an individual can read, write, and comprehend material, as well as, "understand whatever signs, labels, instructions, and directions are necessary to get along within one's environment." The second is functional literacy, which is defined as realized when an individual can function in their own environment and to reach success in their own roles in society. These individuals can "read and write adequately to satisfy the requirements they set for themselves." The question that follows is: are these individuals reaching their actual potentials or are they just surviving in...