Illegal Logging

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Illegal logging

I. Introduction

Introduction to illegal logging

Illegal logging has risen to prominence in international forestry dialogues over the last five years and there is a growing international willingness to combat the problem. There is widespread recognition of its linkages to ineffective governance, social conflict and violence. Illegal logging practices and trade cost the producers of legitimately sourced wood products billions of dollars in lost revenue. Considerable harm to forests and forest ecosystems may also occur.

WHAT IS ILLEGAL LOGGING?

Illegal logging takes place when timber is harvested, transported, bought or sold in violation of national and/or international laws. It is a pervasive problem in many countries where it is undermining authorities’ efforts to manage forests sustainable. It is difficult to give a global definition of illegal logging because much depends on the specific laws of an individual country. New Zealand accepts that sovereign nations are best placed to confirm the legality of timber operations and timber trade. In cases where forest governance, law enforcement and sustainable forest management (SFM) are weaker than desired, we acknowledge that partnerships involving the sharing of information and best practices may be helpful in ensuring legality. EXAMPLES OF ILLEGAL LOGGING

Examples of illegal logging are:
• logging protected species;
• duplication of felling licenses;
• logging in protected areas;
• logging outside concession boundaries;
• logging in prohibited areas such as steep slopes, riverbanks and water catchments; • logging without authorization;
• Obtaining logging concessions through bribes;
• Transporting illegally harvested timber;
• Exporting timber in contravention of national bans;
• Declaring lower values and volumes than actually exported; • Ignoring environmental, social and labor laws and regulation. r

Illegal Logging: Background and Issues

Illegal logging is a pervasive problem affecting countries that produce, export, and import wood and wood products. Some have estimated that between 2% and 4% of softwood lumber1 and plywood traded globally, and as much as 23% to 30% of hardwood lumber and plywood traded globally, could be from illegal logging activities. The World Bank estimates that illegal logging costs governments approximately $15 billion annually in lost royalties.3 Illegal logging is a concern to many because of its economic implications as well as its environmental, social, and political impacts. Some are concerned that U.S. demand for tropical timber from countries in Latin America and Southeast Asia may be a driver of illegal logging. The United States is the world’s largest wood products consumer and one of the top importers of tropical hardwoods. For example, the United States is the largest importer of Peruvian mahogany, which some estimate to be 80% illegally logged. Some others contend that illegal logging activities devalue U.S. exports of timber. According to one study, illegal logging of round wood and its wood products depresses world wood prices on average by 7%-16% annually. If there were no illegally logged wood in the global market, it has been projected that the value of U.S. exports of round wood, sawn wood, and panels could increase by an average of approximately $460 million each year. This estimate is provided by a U.S. industry trade association opposed to low-cost imports

Statement of the problem

Illegal logging has caused extreme damage to the environment, the problem in this study is what are the causes of illegal logging and how can we stop this problem from growing.

Significance of the study

The significance of this study is to show that Illegal is not only causing problems to the world but to our society as well. Every year, millions of trees...
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