Illegal Immigrants Deportation

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Illegal Immigrants Deportation

There has been an issue for several years in the United States, and yet it hasn’t been resolved. While the government is looking for a solution, there have been so many families that are getting separated just because they are deporting too many people. Some states that have made their own laws which are laws that are absolutely unconstitutional, such as the one from Arizona the SB-1070, which that law allows the police within that state, to stop and interrogate any person who appears to be an immigrant. They can be identified by their skin color, and their way of talking. That law is unconstitutional because the police are judging because of their appearance. The government cares about getting the immigrants out of this country without considering that they are separating families and that without the immigrants, this country wouldn’t be as strong economically. In the Star Spangled Banner, there’s a part where it says “O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave?” what really captures my attention was where it said that this country is the home of the brave. Many immigrants cross the desert; they don’t ride in a car or anything like that. They run day and night, hot and cold, many people who come to this country are brave enough to cross the desert without stopping, knowing that hundreds of immigrants die trying to come to this country. All they have with them, throughout the trip, is a gallon of water. The desert reaches over 100 degrees during the day and during night the temperature drops under 80 degrees. For people who risk their lives just to get to this country, I consider them brave so by what the Star Spangled Banner says, this is their home too, because they are brave. That’s one of the reason why I’m against immigrants deportation. Georgia and Alabama enacted laws that penalized illegal immigrants recently. Now the two states are learning the consequences. Supporters of the laws believed the new sanctions would drive away only illegal immigrants. In fact, Hispanics with legal status or even U.S. citizenship also are moving elsewhere. Many people ask why leave? But that’s the wrong question; the correct question is why on earth stay? Why stay in a state that immigrants believe oppresses the entire Hispanic community? Why stay when government launches an assault that splits Latino families and opens the door to racial profiling? The lawmakers also failed to take into account the contribution immigrant labor was making toward rebuilding areas devastated by this year's storms. Contractors in Tuscaloosa, Ala., say Hispanic workers have left and they can't find replacements to repair the tornado damage. Republican lawmakers assured skeptics that American workers would be only too happy to step in and take the jobs that immigrants left. Farmers in Alabama and Georgia are still waiting. Georgia tried giving farm work to prison inmates, until they lost their appetite for backbreaking 10-hour workdays at minimum wage. If inmates were willing to work that hard, they wouldn't be in prison to begin with. According to Georgia farm officials, $140 million in crops has been lost because of the state's labor shortages since the law began in July 2011. The lawmakers remind you that none of these consequences was intended, of course. As the world's leading superpower, it is the responsibility of the United States to serve as a haven for immigrants escaping devastating conditions. Many immigrants are fleeing from famine, war, political strife, or religious persecution. It is a responsibility, and/or merely a good act, to protect these people by allowing them to take refuge and start new lives in the United States. Americans oppose the deportation of all illegal immigrants. A USA Today Poll dated March 2007 asked, "Should the government deport all illegal immigrants back to their home country?" In response, only 24% of...
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