Ikea's Swot Analysis

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Ref. http://www.thetimes100.co.uk/case-study--swot-analysis-sustainable-business-planning--110-368-2.php

IKEA's goals of sustainability and environmental design are central to its business strategy. It has launched a new sustainability plan to take the company through to 2015. This will combine social, environmental and economic issues.

IKEA uses SWOT analysis to help it reach its objectives. This is a strategic planning tool. It helps the business to focus on key issues. SWOT is the first stage of planning and looks at the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats involved in a project or business venture.

Strengths and weaknesses are internal aspects. This means that they are within the control of the business. They may refer to aspects of marketing, finance, manufacturing or organisation. Opportunities and threats are external factors. This means that they are outside the control of the business. These may include the environment, the economic situation, social changes or technological advances, such as the internet.[pic]

A business can create opportunities and counter threats by making the most of its strengths and addressing its weaknesses. For example, one of IKEA's key strengths is its strategic aim to use no more material than necessary in the production of each item. In addition, it develops its product plans to increase its use of waste or recycled materials.

• One particular table, the NORDEN table, uses knotty birch wood. The knots in this wood usually mean it is rejected by other retailers and manufacturers as unsuitable for use. However, IKEA has made the knots part of its design feature. • OGLA chairs are made using wood waste from saw mills and LACK tables use a 'sandwich' of stiff card between wood sheets to reduce the amount of solid wood needed.

Ref. http://www.thetimes100.co.uk/case-study--swot-analysis-sustainable-business-planning--110-368-3.php

Strengths could include a company's specialist marketing expertise or its location. They are any aspect of the business that adds value to its product or service. IKEA's strengths include:

• a strong global brand which attracts key consumer groups. It promises the same quality and range worldwide • its vision – 'to create a better everyday life for many people' • a strong concept – based on offering a wide range of well designed, functional products at low prices • a 'democratic design' – reaching an ideal balance between function, quality, design and price. IKEA's 'Cost Consciousness' means that low prices are taken into account when each product is designed from the outset.

These strengths contribute to IKEA being able to attract and retain its customers.

One way IKEA measures its strengths is the use of Key Performance Indicators (KPI). KPIs help IKEA to assess the progress of its vision and long-term goals by setting targets and monitoring progress towards these. An example of one of IKEA's KPIs is the percentage of suppliers that are currently IWAY approved. The IWAY is the IKEA Way of Purchasing Home Furnishing Products. This guideline defines the social and environmental requirements IKEA expects of its suppliers.

IKEA has strengths right through its production processes:

• Increasing use of renewable materials – IKEA improved its overall use from 71% in 2007 to 75% in 2009. • 'Smarter' use of raw materials – IKEA increased the use of recycled or reclaimed waste products in energy production across all stores from 84% in 2007 to 90% in 2009. • Volume commitments – IKEA believes in creating long-term partnerships with its suppliers in order to achieve this. By committing to buying large volumes over a number of years IKEA can negotiate lower prices. This also benefits the suppliers because they enjoy the greater security of having guaranteed orders. • Economies of scale – for instance, bulk buying at cheaper unit costs. • Sourcing materials close to the supply chain to...
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