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Idioms in Newspaper Style

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Idioms in Newspaper Style

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Yerevan State Linguistic University after V. Brusov

Theme: Idioms in newspaper style

Faculty of foreign languages 3th coarse, 4th group
Student: Grigoryan Victoria
Supervisor: Nina Mnatsakanyan

Yerevan 2009

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction…………………..…………………………………………………..……3 Chapter 1: Idiom, general characteristics……………….…………………….…..5 Chapter 2: Newspaper style …………..….… ……………………………….……13 Conclusion…………………………….…………………………………..………….23 Bibliography…………………………….………………………………………….…25

INTRODUCTION

Today the English language is widely spoken throughout the world. It is the language of 21st century the language of informative technologies, so while describing the English language; first of all it should be underlined that the English language is the mother tongue of the global media. To understand English clearly one should know not only its standard vocabulary but also its different styles, dialects, proverbs, sayings, phrasal verbs and idioms, as they are used in any sphere: books, films, newspapers, formal speeches. One, looking through some papers, magazines and journals, will discover the same language to sound quite different, because he will find familiar words with unfamiliar meanings. He will face idioms, phrasal verbs etc. Besides, knowing the standard English perfectly one may have difficulties in understanding for instance American English, as many factors, such as culture, the natives’ language, slang, migration and development of the same language apart in dissimilar conditions, cause many changes in the same English language. The focus of the research project in this paper is to represent idioms in British and American newspapers. Moreover, the research shows information on history of English language newspapers, as well as on idioms. English newspaper writing dates from the 17th century. The first newspaper carried only news, without comments, as commenting was considered to be against the principals of journalism. By the 19th century,...