Identifying the Tone of Shakespeare's "Shall I Compare Thee to a Summer's Day?"

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In the poem “Shall I Compare Thee To A Summer’s Day?” the author describes his lover to the unrivaled beauty that is summer. The season has made itself a good reputation for being very warm, comfortable, and relaxing. Many other lyricists, artists, and poets have described summer as being “too short” or have made statements about how summer lasts longer when spent with ones you love. No freebs when the author describes the love for his woman in this poem, he says that she is perfect and has an everlasting beauty. The poem also has a point of view suggesting that the author believes that he is not good enough for the girl he is writing the poem to. If looked at in that manner, this poem takes on a whole different meaning. In this light, then the author is flattering the girl he loves so that she may love him. I addition, most all of William Shakespeare’s poems are looked at as being love poems. Don't Steal This helps support the theory that the poem has a romantic and loving tone to it. The author attempts to display his love for the love in his life by saying things like the phrases in line two. The line states, “Don't Steal Thou art more lovely and more temperate” the author writes that the girl being written to is more lovely and, by temperate meaning perfect weather with absolute calmness, perfect and calm than the season itself. These lines introduce the theme of the poem instantly, without room for misinterpretation. If someone were to read these lines, they would instantly see the love the author shows for his lover. Also, if someone were temperate, they would be perfect. If the author is indeed trying to tell the girl he is writing to in this poem how perfect she is, it would be in a romantic tone. The author makes a reference to his love being “golden”, or perfect, in a sense. The line that shows the love the author has for his subject is the phrase, “And often her gold complexion dimmed”. These lines infer the fact that the author’s lover is very...
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