Ict and Nigerian Education

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RESTRUCTURING NIGERIAN SECONDARY EDUCATION SYSTEM THROUGH INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY (ICT) – DRIVEN CURRICULUM

DR. LILIAN-RITA AKUDOLU
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATIONS
NNAMDI AZIKIWE UNIVERSITY AWKA

ABSTRACT

This paper presents a survey, which is aimed at identifying the extent to which it is necessary to restructure secondary education through Information and Communications technology (ICT) – driven curriculum. The survey covered secondary school teachers in Anambra State. Three research questions guided the study. The major finding was that there is urgent need for restructuring teaching/learning process in secondary schools in terms of teachers and material resources. This is to ensure that the system prepares leaners for effective life in an ICT dominated world. Some suggestions were given for the effective implementation of an ICT-driven curriculum.

INTRODUCTION
The primary aim of education is to prepare learners for effective life in the society. To achieve this aim, every school system makes use of curriculum. Mkpa (1987:34) opines that: -

In a functional curriculum the programme objectives should derive from the needs and aspirations, and/or problems of the society. Since the school is established to serve the society, the objectives of the school must be tailored toward meeting the needs and aspirations of the society.

The needs of the individual are subsumed within those of the society since a society is made up of individuals. Consequently, education is of functional value to the extent that it enables individuals perform desired activities in a given society. Education that is not functional is characterized as deficient (Okafor, 1984).

The wake of this millennium has witnessed a mismatch between the education children receive in Nigerian schools and the life activities they are expected to engage in. it is painful to observe young graduates roaming the streets unsuccessfully looking for jobs while employers spend their time looking for competent workers. It is a problem of putting a square peg in a round hole. This is the era of technology revolution, the information age. Yet, it appears that the Nigerian education system has been overtaken by events. Perelman (1990:16ED) generally laments that “Education has been unmatched, though in its wasteful inefficiency and technological backwardness”.

Since education lags behind technology advancement and it is education that prepares man for life, a change is urgently required. Perelman (1990:12ED) notes that: - Learning has become the strategically central enterprise for national competitiveness that steelwork was in the Industrial Age. As a result, the first nation not to “reform” its education and training institutions but to replace them with a brand-new high tech. electronic – schools learning system will be the dominant world economic leader in the 21st century.

Perelman is advocating restructuring of education to make it appropriate for Information Age. Education restructuring for Information Age is the process of exploiting technology to redesign and improve the total process of education. There is urgent need for education restructuring to ensure that education continues to produce effective citizens. In this regard, Vaille (1999:5) opines that “Educators are in the process of changing the what, where and how well of teaching and learning, and technology is at the heart of the change process”. In fact Mecklenburger (1990) had earlier called for a technology revolution in education.

For education restructuring to be effective, the education system must address what Winslow (1990:40ED) calls the “three Rs” of educational reform – first research, then redesign and finally reform. This means that having computers in the classroom is not enough to support the on going learning revolution. Pearlman in Bruder (1990:ED33) maintains that “changing the way teachers teach and the way...
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