Ice Cream Industry Analysis

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  • Topic: Ice cream, Baskin-Robbins, Milk
  • Pages : 25 (8069 words )
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  • Published : January 4, 2011
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| Ice Creams| Frozen Deserts|
Defination :| Ice cream is a frozen dessert usually made from dairy products, such as milk and cream, and often combined with fruits or other ingredients and flavours| A frozen dessert is any type of dessert made by freezing a mixture of liquids, semi-solids, and sometimes even solids.| Fat Content:| Contain at least 10 percent milk fat and 6 percent non-fat milk solids.| Anything less than those are considered to be different frozen desserts.| Texture:| Ice creams are creamier and richer in flavor| Less creamier and richer as compared to ice creams| Process Of Making:| Complicated and delicate process of making. The process of making ice cream aims to emulsify ingredients together and make the mixture foamy.| Less complicated process of making and much faster | Categories:| Ice creams are further categorized based on the amount of milk fat it has for example 1. Regular Ice Creams – more amount of milk fat. 2. Premium Ice Creams – less amount of milk fat| Frozen desserts can be categorized on the basis of a lot of things.| Ingredients:| Milk fat, non-fat milk solids, sugar/flavoring, and air.| Sorbets, low-fat ice cream, frozen yogurt, and frozen custard.|

The ice cream industry in India is in many ways, reflective of the overall population distribution.  The country’s population is primarily rural with approximately 65% of the population living in villages with a population of less than 5,000; this means there are well over 150,000 villages with a combined population in excess of 650 million.  This has contributed to a highly fragmented industry that by many estimates has over 70,000 ice cream entities.  Many of these are single family operations where the product is made either in the home or in very small factories and sold on the streets.  The 350 million remaining people are concentrated in the cities where the industry is reasonably concentrated in the hands of a few international and domestic firms.  It is estimated that only 30% of the entire market is “organized” and the industry meets the classic definition of a fragmented industry, that is, one where there is an absence of market leaders with the power to shape industry events. The Indian ice cream industry is currently estimated to be worth Rs. 2,000 crores; growing at a rate of approximately 12% explains RS Sodhi, Chief General Manager of Gujarat Co-operative Milk Marketing (GCMMF), the makers of Amul. The ice cream market in India can be divided into: The Branded Market: Amul, Kwality Walls, Vadial, Mother Dairy, Scoops and Others. The Gray Market: small local players and cottage industry players.

Industry at a glance|
The ice cream industry in India is worth Rs. 2,000 crores| The industry can be divided into the branded market and the unbranded market. The branded market at present is 100 million liters per annum valued at Rs. 800 crores| n 2008-09, in the branded ice cream market, Amul held the number one spot, with a market share or 38%, followed by Kwality Walls at 14%, Vadilal at 12% and Mother Diary at 8%| The per capita consumption of ice cream in India is approximately 300 ml, as against the world average of 2.3 liters per annum| Vanilla, Strawberry and Chocolate together constitute approximately 60% of the market.| Indian summers are synonymous with ice creams. A number of colorful pushcarts selling the choicest of ice creams in numerous flavors from the traditional vanilla and chocolate to unusual varieties like Mother Diary’s Shahi Nazrana can be seen. The ice cream range for the children would be entirely different from that of a teenager or for that matter adult. For those who like to have ice cream in peace, there are a number of ice cream parlors that are opening shop. A 100 ml scoop of ice cream may contain upto 50% air! This...
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