Iago, the Villain

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AP English IV
15 March 2013
Iago
Shakespeare successful used the power of language in his plays, especially Othello. In that tragedy, Iago plays an important and major role and is described by Shakespeare as a villain, liar, and masculine; he shows his felling to the audience by the use of speech. These monologues of Iago are used to create mystery and lead the downfall of the protagonists in the play. By the end of the play, the audiences can see through the irony in Iago’s last words. A fundamental reason for Iago’s success is his ability to appear ‘honest’, he is given to use the power of language to manipulation and direct other characters. The language is used to make the success of the play; when it is put into the Othello’s soliloquies, it is in positive way. However it shows the down when Shakespeare put that powerful toward the billing hand like Iago, it is corrupt Iago manages to do most of the evil. “Honest” that word is repeated over and over in this play. The villain, Iago is referred to as honest which is certainly ironic. The success of Iago’s deceiving honesty is clearly seen in the final scene in which the using of dishonesty is revealed. The ambiguity from Iago is exasperating to the audience because it is supposed to show the devil of the play confesses everything and pray for his guilty but Iago’s last words are just “Demand me nothing; what you know, you know: from this time forth I never will speak word.” The last speech of Iago shows the irony of the play that Iago’s character is an honest man in a funny way because he never speaks out the truth. As for Iago’s character as a tragic villain, an antagonist, it is told to show the success from the beginning of the play. Iago did confess him “I am not what I am”- ironic because Iago is the symbol of the mystery around the evil will.
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