Hypnosis for Pregnancy and Birth

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 37
  • Published : April 18, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
  The
 state
 of
 hypnosis
 may
 be
 described
 a
 state
 of
 deep
 physical
 relaxation,
 but
  with
 a
 focused
 mind.
 
 In
 this
 alpha
 brain
 wave
 state
 the
 unconscious
 mind
 can
 be
  more
 readily
 accessed,
 as
 some
 of
 the
 critical
 faculties
 of
 the
 conscious
 mind
 are
  temporarily
 suspended
 (Mantle
 2000).
 The
 hypnotic
 state
 is
 known
 to
 be
 a
  phenomenon
 that
 occurs
 naturally,
 and
 we
 all
 enter
 hypnotic-­‐like
 states
 for
  varying
 reasons,
 perhaps
 several
 times
 a
 day
 (James
 2010).
 Clinical
 hypnosis
  simply
 serves
 to
 enhance
 this
 natural
 state
 and
 utilise
 its
 effects
 for
 positive
  change
 in
 an
 individual.
 Hypnosis
 is
 a
 voluntary
 state,
 and
 the
 individual
 is
 in
  control
 throughout
 (James
 2010).
 Therefore,
 it
 could
 be
 argued
 that
 all
 hypnosis
  is
 self-­‐hypnosis,
 even
 when
 facilitated
 by
 a
 hypnotherapist.
 
 
 Its
 main
 advantage,
  as
 a
 therapy
 for
 pregnant
 women,
 is
 that
 it
 appears
 to
 be
 both
 effective
 and
 safe
  (Mantle
 2000).
 
  The
 hypnotherapeutic
 protocol,
 around
 which
 this
 assignment
 is
 based,
 concerns
  the
 reduction
 of
 stress,
 anxiety
 and
 fear
 in
 relation
 to
 labour
 and
 birth.
 Stress
  and
 anxiety
 associated
 with
 a
 fear
 of
 giving
 birth
 is
 very
 common
 in
 pregnancy.
  Tsui
 et
 al.
 (2006)
 found
 that
 even
 amongst
 a
 group
 of
 “low
 risk”
 pregnant
  women,
 some
 degree
 of
 fear
 of
 childbirth
 was
 a
 frequent
 occurrence.
 For
 some
  women,
 this
 state
 goes
 beyond
 anxiety
 and
 becomes
 a
 phobia,
 a
 state
 known
 as
  tocophobia,
 a
 morbid
 fear
 of
 giving
 birth.
 The
 detrimental
 effects
 of
 maternal
  anxiety
 and
 stress
 on
 the
 fetus
 are
 well
 documented
 (Lazinski
 et
 al
 2008).
 For
  the
 pregnant
 women
 her
 self,
 significant
 stress
 and
 anxiety
 are
 likely
 to
 lead
 to
 a
  variety
 of
 physical
 and
 psychological
 ailments
 (Tiran
 and
 Chummum
 2004).
  Antenatal
 anxieties
 about
 giving
 birth
 may
 also
 affect
 birth
 outcomes.
 
 Anecdotal
  evidence
 from
 the
 recent
 media
 suggests
 that
 anxiety
 about
 giving
 birth
 may
 lead
  to
 women
 opting
 for
 a
 caesarian
 section,
 with
 its
 associated
 risks
 to
 their
 health
  Eithne
 Clarke
  1
 
 


  in
 terms
 of
 a
 higher
 incidence
 of
 morbidity
 and
 mortality,
 compared
 to
 vaginal
  birth,
 and
 increased
 expenditure
 for
 an
 already
 stretched
 National
 Health
  Service.
 Increased
tracking img