Human Trafficking

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The Human Toy

In our world today, we see and hear about an abundance of crime and human dysfunction. We see cases of illegal trade of weapons and drugs. Yes, this causes distress throughout the county and our world, but these are just “things.” Beyond the drugs and weapons, there is an even worse kind of illegal trade. Humans. Besides the illegal trade of weapons and drugs, human trafficking is the third largest illegal money-maker (Farr 2). Human trafficking is the purchase, sale, recruitment, harboring, transportation, transfer, or receipt of a person for the purpose of commercial sex (Gerdes 19). This being the world’s third largest illegal industry, it is rarely heard of and expressed.

Human Trafficking is an enormous global problem. Of the estimated four million people who are trafficked around the world each year, over one million are trafficked into the sex industry. The volume keeps increasing. Researchers believe that the “actual” numbers are much higher than these estimates because many instances of trafficking go undetected (Farr 3). Researchers have concluded that sex trafficking is one of the most, if not the most, rapidly growing form of human trafficking (Farr 5). This industry is expanding at an ever accelerating rate, operating in marketplaces where supply and demand are high and risks to the traffickers are low, making it a highly profitable and enduring business (Farr 3). ,

The fastest-growing source region is the former Soviet States now known as the NIS (Newly Independent States). Not only did they serve as the fastest-growing source region, but also they were the introductory, contextual example of the supply side of sex trafficking. Most recent studies suggest that there are as many as 500,000 women from the NIS sold into prostitution each year. An estimated seventy percent of these women are trafficked to Western Europe, and another fifteen percent are sent to the Middle East and Southeast Asia (Farr 8). Researchers believe that the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 really surged the rise of sex trafficking (Farr 12). This was the take-off for the human sex trafficking business.

Human Traffickers are smart and have a distinct way of luring in their victim. Many of these victims are East European women and girls from rural areas in search for jobs in fashion, tourism, housekeeping, catering, or entertainment which promises travel documents, transport, comfortable accommodation, and even education. Many of the times, these promises are nothing more than the predator’s way of capturing the prey. The victims’ passports are taken away and they are taken to a different country in order for there to be no trace of them (Gerdes 35). This makes it extremely difficult to track down missing people. Chances of finding them after they have been kidnapped are slim to none.

Recently, I had watched a video on YouTube about a young girl named Katya. She was lured into the United States by being promised a job such as waitressing and an education. Little did she know, she would not be getting either of the two. The traffickers forced her to make a thousand dollars a day, whether it is by stripping at a club, or prostitution. When she would return at the end of the day with their a thousand dollars, that they did not get to keep, she would be held captive in a an apartment. Katya was raped and beaten regularly. Luckily, she had met a man at the strip club willing to get her out of the mess she was in. This man saved her life. Katya is just one of the few victims that actually gets another chance at life (http://www.youtube.com/watch?...). Women and girls are so easily lured into this business.

Not only are women trafficked, but also there are a large handful of children including boys and girls trafficked. Most of these children are exploited by local men although some are also prostituted by pedophiles and foreign tourists. Some of these children may have...
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