Human Trafficking

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Modern day human trafficking and slavery has its roots and its ancient times.

Humanity has evolved only to still practice some of the earliest crimes known to man. In

other words, slavery (human trafficking).Although the British settlers who settled in the

New World started the African slave trade, Britain was main country to push for an end to

African slave trade. In 1807, the British parliament banned slave trade and in 1833,

slavery was abolished from British colonies. However, by then human trafficking and

slave trade had made many people rich and economies of certain colonies and nations

were built by these slaves. Thereafter for decades, Britain forced countries to adopt anti-

slavery policies and were successful by and large. However, this paved way for white

slavery (and as well as colored human trafficking) , which was commonly used to

describe all forms of prostitution -- licensed and coerced. Later; on the other hand, after

WWI, prostitution becomes illegal making human trafficking become extremely risky a

and decreasing in popularity.(Gupta 2). This past leads us to the very present day where

now, against the commands of the law, Human traffickers have decided to revive the

business of slavery. With the popularity of trafficking at its peak, the number of targets

have increased, leaving the resulting statistics quite astonishing.

As it is mostly a underground industry, estimates of scale and size are bound to be unknown. However, the most widely accepted figures, from the U.S state department, indicate that 600,000 to 800,000 people are trafficked across international borders each year; 70% are women, most of whom are destined for the sex trade (Gupta 1). “In Britain, it is estimated that 80% of the 80,000 women in prostitution are foreign nationals, most of whom have been trafficked” (Thrupkaew 3). These Statistics are important, because there is a disgraceful attempt by...
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