Human Rights and UN Convention on the Right of a Child

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Provide a description of how the following laws and codes of practice affect work in schools and promote pupils well-being and achievement: Human Rights and UN Convention on the Right of a Child
Equality Act 2010 (including Disability Discrimination Act)
Data Protection Act and Freedom of Information Act 1998
The SEN Code of Practice 2001 and Special Education Needs Act 2001 Children Act (alongside with Every Child Matters) 2004 and 2006 Education Act 2002 (further amended in 2006)
Remember to list resources used and ensure you answer the question.

LAWS and CODES OF PRACTICE
DESCRIPTION OF HOW IT AFFECTS WORK IN SCHOOLS AND PROMOTE PUPILS WELLBEING AND ACHIEVEMENT

Human Rights and UN Convention on the Right of a Child

UNCRC 1989, ratified in UK in 1991. 54 articles, the ones relating to schools: Article 2 – right to protection from any form of discrimination Art. 3 – the best interest of the child is a primary consideration Art 12 – children have right to express their views

Art 13 – children have right to receive and share information as long as this information is not damaging to others Art 14 - children have a right to freedom of religion although they should also be free to examine their beliefs Art 28 – equal right to education

Art 29 – children’s education should develop each child’s personality, talents and abilities to the fullest. They should also learn to leave peacefully and respect the environment and others. Some of the articles of Human Rights that have a link to school provision: Article 2 – the right to education (although it does not mean the right to go to a chosen school) Art. 8 – the right to respect for private and family life

Art. 10 - the right to freedom of expression

What impact those pieces of legislation have on school and how it promotes pupils’ well being and achievement? All children have the right to a free primary education, regardless their race, sex, religion or abilities. Schools must ensure compliance with this fundamental right and enshrine the principles of equality, respect and non-discrimination in their policies, opening the door to all children and giving them a chance to learn and achieve. The articles have a big positive impact on pupils as they are protected from any form of discrimination ensuring they can focus on learning and greater achievement. Children’s wellbeing should be paramount, Schools’ policies must ensure they set a safe environment where all children can realise their potential, without fear of violence, bullying, or being undermined by demining disciplinary actions or comments, building a positive image of themselves. The best interests of children must be the primary consideration. Schools must ensure proper support and attention. When schools make decisions on anything from policies to how they budget they should think about how these decisions will affect the children. The Convention encourages adults to listen to the opinions of children and involve them in the decision-making process. Children have the right to say what they think and schools should take their opinions into account. Schools use School’s Councils as their main participatory tool to achieve this. More informally pupils can be consulted on a range of issues during assemblies and at classroom level. Schools must pursue policies that encourage children to achieve the highest level of education they are capable of; being able to access and share age-appropriate information is an essential constituent of this. Schools should teach the children that in exercising their freedom of expression they have the responsibility to also respect the rights, freedoms and reputations of others. Through their curriculum schools develop the children’s knowledge of their own culture and religion) as well as that of others; they learn to value them and they develop their awareness of themselves and others in their...
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