Human Resource Planning

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PROJECT REPORT
ON
HUMAN RESOURCE PLANNING
Date of submission: 16-11-2010.

Submitted to
Dr. Nilanjan Sengupta
Submitted by
Group No:1
Group Members:
Aadil Ahmed (01)
Arjjun Kumaar G.M (16)
Harish Kharthik R (36)
Pragadeeswari R (61)
Shashwati Gupta (82)

Acknowledgement
We would like to express our gratitude to Dr.Nilanjan Sengupta, for his guidance and providing us with an opportunity to work on the project of “Human Resource Planning”, which has enabled us to develop a better understanding of the subject.

Aadil Ahmed
Arjjun Kumar G
Harish Karthik
Pragadeeswari R
Shashwati Gupta

Index

1. Introduction
2. Literature Review
2.1 Factors Underlying Increased Interest in Human Resource Planning
2.2 Model for describing Human Resource Planning
3. Corporate Illustrations
3.1 Wipro
3.2 Toto
3.3 McDonalds’
4. Conclusion
5. Bibliography

1. Introduction
Human resource planning has traditionally been used by organizations to ensure that the right person is in the right job at the right time. Under past conditions of relative environmental certainty and stability, human resource planning focused on the short term and was dictated largely by line management concerns. Increasing environmental instability, demographic shifts, changes in technology, and heightened international competition are changing the need for and the nature of human resource planning in leading organizations. Planning is increasingly the product of the interaction between line management and planners. In addition, organizations are realizing that in order to adequately address human resource concerns, they must develop long-term as well as short term solutions. As human resource planners involve themselves in more programs to serve the needs of the business, and even influence the direction of the business, they face new and increased responsibilities and challenges. In an early treatment of the topic, Vetter (1967) defined human resource planning as the process by which management determines how the organization should move from its current manpower position to its desired position. Through planning, management strives to have the right number and the right kinds of people, at the right places, at the right time, doing things which result in both the organization and the individual receiving maximum long-run benefits. Because a major objective of planning is facilitating an organization's effectiveness, it must be integrated with the organization's short-term and long-term business objectives and plans. Increasingly this is being done in leading organizations, although in the past business needs usually defined personnel needs and human resource planning, which meant that planning became a reactive process. The reactive nature of the process went hand-in-hand with a short-term orientation. Now, major changes in business, economic, and social environments are creating uncertainties that are forcing organizations to integrate business planning with human resource planning and to adopt a longer term perspective. Human resources is part of the strategic (business) planning process. It is a part of policy development, line extension planning and the merger and acquisition processes. Little is done in the company that does not involve us in the planning, policy or finalization stages of any deal. An integrated linkage between business and human resource plans is one by which human resource and line managers work jointly to develop business plans and determine human resource needs, analyze the work force profile in terms of future business strategies, review emerging human resource issues, and develop programs to address the issues and support the business plans. These joint efforts occur when human resource planners convince corporate business planners that "human resources represent a...
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