Huey P Long

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  • Topic: Huey Long, Louisiana State University, Alvin Olin King
  • Pages : 8 (2635 words )
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  • Published : April 10, 2013
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Brandon Jones
Mr. Collick
English 2-C
4/26/12
Huey P. Long: Rise to Power
I. Thesis:
There are many inspirational leaders of United States such as George Washington and Ben Franklin, but none of them were ever more brilliant than Huey P. Long II. A. Early Life
a) Birth
b) School
c) As a teenager
d) College
III.B. Adulthood
a) Salesman
b) Marriage
c) Lawyer
III. C. Political Office
a) Railroad Commissioner
b) Election
c) Election Results
IV. D. Governor of Louisiana
a) Luxuries as Governor
b) First act in office
c) Keeping the people happy
V. E. Senator
a) Share our Wealth
VI. F. Death
a) How he died and where
b) Memorials built
VII. H. Conclusion

Huey P. Long: Rise to Power
People call him a “Crook” others call him a “Hero.” this legendary governor of Louisiana accomplished what was thought to be impossible, “Surviving the Depression.” There are many inspirational leaders of United States such as George Washington and Ben Franklin, but none of them were ever more brilliant than Huey P. Long

Huey P. Long born August 30th, 1893 was the seventh child of Caledonia Long and Huey Pierce Long Sr. He lived on a farm in Winnfield; a poor community town located in North Central Louisiana. Having to live the life of a poor farm boy was difficult, first off most of his brothers and sisters died due to disease or malnutrition, as a result, young Huey was the third living child in the family.

Unlike other children Huey disliked playing outside, while kids were outside playing games and baseball he was inside reading books and studying the anatomy of animals. Huey was also fascinated with vehicles; whenever the train would stop in town Huey would watch silently underneath the train tracks. His father would often say “Young Huey would jump in a well just to see what it was like” (CDF).

In Winnfield public schools were scarce in order to get an education children were home schooled. Huey would listen to his mother teaching his older brother about the Bible in addition to penmanship, writing, math, history, classic literature and poetry (CDF websolutions). To get a proper education, his father and a couple of neighbors saved up money and bought a subscription school which is a one room school for children for all ages.

When Huey was 11 years old he attended local public schools. Blessed with photographic memory and his persuasive charm, he convinced his teacher to move him up to seventh grade. In 1910 he completed 11th grade, unfortunately, the school board initiated a law that clearly stated “in order to graduate high school you must attend 12th grade”. Furious Huey formed a petition and he was expelled due to involvement.

Huey was an excellent debater in high school and won a scholarship to Louisiana State University; however, he could not afford the textbooks. By putting his persuasive charm to use he became a traveling salesman at age 17. He said “Attending this school was a waste of my talents for they clearly didn’t recognize my talent as a debater if they would have paid for my full tuition” (Long 8).

Things were going great until Huey was discharged, he moved to Houston in hopes to find another salesman job but he couldn’t secure a job. Huey traveled to many cities such as Memphis and Oklahoma but couldn’t find anything that had a job opening. After speaking to a Dr. Dawson he learned that there was a local town offering an office for a salesman. With a smile on his face and his eyes sparking success he took the job in January 2, 1912. “But a problem still persists how was I to get to Norman” (Long 10).

Cold winds and Snow covered Norman and Huey only had 5 cents and could not afford a bus to Norman in order to get to Norman he had to walk 18 miles and that’s what he did. After a day of walking he arrived on a bright and sunny day eager to begin working. On his first day...
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